CFP : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums

Frederick MacKenzie, The National Gallery when at Mr J.J. Angerstein's House, Pall Mall, 1824-34, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Frederick MacKenzie, The National Gallery when at Mr J.J. Angerstein’s House, Pall Mall, 1824-34, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

CALL FOR PAPERS : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums

University of Leeds, 30th-31st March 2017

Deadline for Abstracts: Tuesday 1st November 2016

 

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Susanna Avery-Quash, Senior Research Curator (History of Collecting) at the National Gallery, London

This two-day conference investigates the relationships between ‘private’ collections of art (fine art, decorative art and antiquities), and the changing dynamics of their display in ‘public’ exhibitions and museums. This shift from ‘private’ to ‘public’ involves a complex dialectic of socio-cultural forces, together with an increasing engagement with the art market. The conference aims to explore the relationship between the ‘private’ and ‘public’ spheres of the home and the museum, and to situate this within the scholarship of the histories of the art market and collecting. Continue reading “CFP : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums”

CONF: The Art Market, Collectors and Agents: Then and Now, Part II, 19-20 Oct, Paris

The Art Market, Collectors and Agents: Then and Now

19-20 October 2016 at the INHA, Paris

The purpose of our October conference is to develop further the initial conference in July. Papers concentrate on the later period of collecting, from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, in particular considering how the agent has gradually become the consultant/dealer in the modern art market. Thus the conference should allow for a fascinating juxtaposition of historic and contemporary practice. It should also offer a deeper understanding of the private and often hidden side of the market, one that is not represented through the study of auctions alone. Continue reading “CONF: The Art Market, Collectors and Agents: Then and Now, Part II, 19-20 Oct, Paris”

L: Diana Kostyrko, Rene Gimpel, 18 July, London

Lecture by Diana Kostyrko

‘Transatlantic Courtier and Capricious Patron, Rene Gimpel (1881-1945)’

Monday 18 July 2016 at 6pm

Venue: 30 Davies Street, London

For more information and to register: info@gimpelfils.com

Gimpel Image 2Diana Kostyrko is the author of a book on Rene Gimpel, soon to be published by Brepols publishing.

 

Source: Society for the History of Collecting and Display

 

CONF: Creating Markets, Collecting Art, 14-15 July, London

Christie’s Education Conference 2016

Celebrating 250 years of Christie’s, 14-15 July 2016

To commemorate the anniversary of the foundation of Christie’s auction house in 1766 a two-day conference will be held at Christie’s King Street, St James’s. Organised by Christie’s Education, and celebrating 30 years of the Christie’s Education Trust, the theme of ‘Creating Markets, Collecting Art’ has been chosen to reflect a progressive, collaborative and cross-disciplinary approach to the study of works of art. The conference is designed to explore the interrelationship between commerce, collecting and the idea of the ‘academy’ and how this has evolved over time.

Confirmed keynote speakers at the Conference include Professor Craig Clunas, University of Oxford and Dr Inge Reist, Director of the Center for the History of Collecting, The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library.

Continue reading “CONF: Creating Markets, Collecting Art, 14-15 July, London”

CONF: The Art Market, Collectors and Agents: Then and Now, Part I, 13 July, London

London, The Warburg Institute, July 13, 2016

Studies of the art market have paid great attention to the rise of auctions and the subsequent opening of the art market. However, there was another, equally important part of the art market in the early modern period, namely the agent, who discovered, bought and sold works of art to many of the most important collectors of the day. Agents not only acted as advisors; they set up networks across Europe and even beyond to acquire works of art; they negotiated with sellers and acted as intermediaries for buyers. At a time when prices were negotiable, the agent was often the person who created the true value of a work of art.

Continue reading “CONF: The Art Market, Collectors and Agents: Then and Now, Part I, 13 July, London”