Research going on: Julia May Boddewyn on ‘The Valentine Gallery’

valentine-gallery

The Valentine Gallery

From 1926 to 1947 the Valentine Gallery was a center for modern art on East 57th Street in New York. The gallery’s founder and director, F. Valentine Dudensing (1892-1967), presented the work of contemporary artists — both European and American — to an often skeptical audience. Originally called F. Valentine Dudensing Gallery, the name was shortened to Valentine Gallery in 1927 to avoid confusion with the gallery run by Dudensing’s father and brothers; Dudensing Galleries specialized in American art and at that time had recently relocated to 57th Street.

Julia May Boddewyn is the creator of this website:

“I created the website about the Valentine Gallery because I wanted to correct misinformation that has been published and to share some of the interesting information that I have discovered in the course of my research.  I am trying to reconstruct an inventory of the works that were sold through the gallery because the gallery’s sales records lack critical details, such as title, date, and size.  The website is a way for me to reach out to museums, collectors, and dealers who might have a work that includes the Valentine Gallery in its provenance.  My hope is that with this information I can continue to fill in the missing pieces of this puzzle.”


Julia May Boddewyn is an Independent Researcher based in New York.  She has been studying the Valentine Gallery of New York (1926-1947) and the role of the founder, F. Valentine Dudensing for a number of years now. She is interested in the role Dudensing played in selling works by the School of Paris to American collectors. Julia is also a TIAMSA member.

CFP: Santander Art and Culture Law Review

CFP: Santander Art and Culture Law Review

The Santander Art and Culture Law Review is a bi-annual journal. Its primary objective is to offer both Polish and foreign authors the opportunity to present their research and offer readers the opportunity to read papers by both groups of authors. Each odd-numbered issue of the journal is published in Polish and each even-numbered issue in English. (The papers published in Polish will include a summary and the key words written in English.) The journal and its panel of experts are committed to promote the international transfer of expertise in cultural property law.

Find more information on the website: Art and Culture Law

CFP: The Art of Exhibiting Art (Rome, 27-28 Apr 17)

CFP: Doctoral Study Day – RAHN (Rome Art History Network) 2017

Rome, April 27 – 28, 2017

Deadline: Dec 15, 2016

In situ / Ex situ. The Art of Exhibiting Art: Relationships between Art and Architecture in their Spatial Context

The fifth international doctoral study day of the Rome Art History Network, which will be held on 27-28 April 2017, and organised in partnership with the University of Notre Dame Rome Global Gateway and the Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali, Museo di Roma di Palazzo Braschi, proposes a theoretical and methodological reflection upon the relationships and strategies of installing art and architecture, both inside and outside their original spatial contexts.
It is evident that the work of art always relate to the surrounding spaces. Indeed, the strategies and methods of exhibiting works in situ / ex situ are at the heart of contemporary art-historical debates.

But how does the manipulation of the original spatial context alter the perception of a work of art, or the organic nature of an architectural system? How does a given layout highlight specific characteristics of an artwork? What new meanings does an object assume, following its contextual switch? Are traditional concepts of historiographical concepts still valid for current issues of museology or museography? Does an object’s de-contextualization potentially “save” the art in critical cases, or does it always imply an alteration of its original meanings?

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CFP: Early Modern Low Countries (EMLC)

Call for articles

Early Modern Low Countries (EMLC)

In the spring of 2017, Early Modern Low Countries (EMLC) will publish its first issue. This new open access journal will appear in two installments every year, containing high-quality, original scholarship for an international readership on any aspect of the history and culture of the Low Countries between 1500 and 1800. The successor of two well-reputed Dutch-language journals (De Zeventiende Eeuw and De Achttiende Eeuw) EMLC aspires to publish papers by scholars from various disciplinary backgrounds working anywhere in the world.

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New Article: M. Lincoln & A. Fox, Temporal Dimensions of the London Art Auctions, 1780-1835

M. Lincoln & A. Fox, Temporal Dimensions of the London Art Auctions, 1780-1835

Abstract (DOI)

Fig. 10 James Gillray, A Peep at Christie’s;—or—Tally-ho, & his Nimeney-pimmeney taking the Morning Lounge, published 24 Sept. 1796, etching and aquatint, hand coloured, 35 x 25.7 cm. Collection of the British Museum, London (1868,0808.6552)  Digital image courtesy of Trustees of the British Museum, London
Fig. 10 James Gillray, A Peep at Christie’s;—or—Tally-ho, & his Nimeney-pimmeney taking the Morning Lounge, published 24 Sept. 1796, etching and aquatint, hand coloured, 35 x 25.7 cm. Collection of the British Museum, London (1868,0808.6552) Digital image courtesy of Trustees of the British Museum, London

The rush of activity among London’s auction houses in the first few weeks of summer has long been a familiar occurrence that persists even today. However, this intense seasonal concentration of sales was not always so. This paper draws on quantitative methods to explore the gradual emergence of a tightly scheduled auction season in London at the turn of the nineteenth century, focusing on the sale of paintings.

Continue reading “New Article: M. Lincoln & A. Fox, Temporal Dimensions of the London Art Auctions, 1780-1835”

STIP: up to 13 PhD Grants at “International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture” (Univ. Giessen)

The International Graduate Center for the Study of Culture (GCSC) of Justus Liebig University of Giessen, funded by the excellence cluster of the Federal Government and the individual German states, offers a PhD program of Cultural Studies for the period of three years. This includes further training for those interested in postgraduate degrees. The grant is for both academic as well as non-university careers.

The GCSC has the following research focus*:

  • Research Area 1: Cultural Memory Studies
  • Research Area 2: Cultural Narratologies
  • Research Area 3: Cultural Transformation and Performativity Studies
  • Research Area 4: Visual and Material Culture Studies
  • Research Area 5: Media and Multiliteracy Studies
  • Research Area 6: Cultural Identities
  • Research Area 7: Global Studies and Politics of Space
  • Research Area 8: Cultures of Knowledge, Research and Education

GCSC currently has 5 additional areas of “emerging topics”, to advance, broaden and link the cultural sciences with other disciplines and engage with a wider public outside the academic world. These areas of intersection are:

  • migration
  • economy
  • ecology
  • life sciences
  • religion
  • law

Possible languages of your project are German and English.

Please send your application to GCSC by Feb 1, 2017, following these guidelines GCSC Application

Contact: Ann Van de Veire

Alter Steinbacher Weg 38
35394 Gießen
+49 6419930041
+49 6419930049

* s. dazu University of Giessen and University of Giessen Research

Reference: Bis zu 13 Promotionsstipendien “International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture” (Univ. Giessen), 01.10.2017 – 30.09.2020 Gießen, in: H-Soz-Kult (accessed 24.11.2016)

CONF: French Art Galleries During the German Occupation, Paris, Dec 5, 2016

French Art Galleries During the German Occupation

The Research Project ‘The Artists and Their Galleries – Reciprocal Receptions between Paris and Berlin, 1900-1950‘, conducted at the Centre Georg Simmel (EHESS.CNRS) in Paris, investigates the historic, social and esthetic role of art galleries in the context of emigration.

The upcoming conference on Monday December 5th (9am-6pm), will explore the art galleries during the German occupation of Paris. It will be held at the Centre allemand d’Histoire de l’art, 45 rue de Petits-Champs, 75002 Paris (Conference language: French). The conference is open to all; those who would like to attend should send an e-mail to Denise Vernerey

Les Galeries Francaises sous l’occupation