CONF: The Material Reception of Antiquity (Leiden, 13 Dec 2018)

Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (National Museum of Antiquities), Leiden, Leemans Room, December 13, 2018

THE MATERIAL RECEPTION OF ANTIQUITY
A joint conference of the National Museum of Antiquities, the Material Agency Forum and the Byvanck Chair for the History of Classical Art and Archaeology

It is commonly accepted that knowledge of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome came to us largely through written sources. At the same time, it is generally acknowledged that the material remains of Egyptian, Greek and Roman cultures are so impressive that they cannot be ignored as important sources as well. We are obliged to pay attention to these material witnesses of ancient times. However, as script is transferred to the next generations by often formal learning processes, we find it still hard to understand how the impact of material remains is transferred over time.

Reception studies have been a core activity in the humanities since the Renaissance, where classics, egyptology, art history and archaeology meet. The humanist, antiquarian and philological strands have been renewed in the nineteenth century by the rise of archaeology and art history as academic disciplines. In the twentieth century Aby Warburg completely reformulated the question as one of the survival of antiquity and its underlying psychological mechanisms, and more recently reception studies received powerful impulses from German reception aesthetics and Anglo-Saxon more visually oriented reception studies within classics.

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ANN: Il collezionismo di antichità classiche a Capri tra fine Ottocento e primo Novecento

Il volume si compone di due sezioni: la prima, a firma di Luca Di Franco, Giancarlo Di Martino, Carmen D’ Anna e Silvio La Paglia, analizza le principali collezioni private di antichità classiche che trovarono luogo sull’ isola di Capri tra Ottocento e primo Novecento. La seconda sezione, a cura di Luca Di Franco, Giancarlo Di Martino, Paolo Cimadomo, Carmen D’ Anna, Silvio La Paglia, Ludovica Matrullo e Francesca Mermati, èdedicata alla schedatura delle collezioni Cerio e Pagano, attualmente conservate presso il Centro Caprense Ignazio Cerio, e di ciò che rimane della collezione MacKowen presso la Casa Rossa di Anacapri.
Il volume, dunque, guarda quello che è comunemente definito mito di Capri partendo dalla nuova prospettiva della cultura antiquaria, che sull’ isola trova una propria dimensione e dinamiche del tutto peculiari.

ANN: Les Collections Rothschild dans les institutions publiques françaises, 4, 5 & 6 décembre 2018 à l’INHA

À l’occasion des très récentes mises en ligne de l’inventaire des collections de la Villa Ephrussi de Rothschild (porcelaines, mobilier, sculpture médiévale, tableaux et dessins) ainsi que des notices des oeuvres conservées dans la salle des Curiosités de l’Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art organise un colloque sur l’ensemble des donations de cette famille cosmopolite permettant de découvrir – ou de redécouvrir – des corpus inédits d’oeuvres passés de la sphère privée à la sphère publique. Un concert est également organisé pour accompagner l’évènement afin de rendre compte du soutien que la famille a apporté dans tous les domaines de la création, notamment musicale.

EN SAVOIR PLUS

CONF: Postwar Narratives of Collecting (Rome, 14 Dec 18)

Rome, Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, December 14, 2018

Why do we collect, how do we legitimise it for ourselves or for others, and what does that say about our culture? Collecting as a practice has been studied from various perspectives, beginning with Julius von Schlosser who in 1908 regarded it as a characteristic trait of the human soul – collecting objects was part of an inborn urge. Based on Lacan, Mieke Bal sustained the same in her famous essay on collecting, but then from a narrativist perspective – each collection is an on-going narrative for the collector as an individual by which means (s)he sublimates anxieties. Meanwhile, the collecting of contemporary art has attracted a lot of scholarly and critical attention in the last decades, but the discussion of this phenomenon decidedly deviated from the psychological perspective by focusing on the economic aspects of the art markets and their global development, the postcolonial situation, interculturality and the rise of the non-western artist. While the former, psychological perspective suggests that collecting does not change over time, the latter strand of research starts from the assumption that indeed collecting has very recently changed, quite radically even, turning into a global phenomenon.

The present workshop, organized by Arnold Witte, aims to open up a new perspective by building on both traditions but confronting the underlying assumptions. It starts with the observation that after 1945 the acquisition of contemporary art works became ever more important for a growing public – thanks to new buyers and as a result of government policies in industrialized countries – and institutions such as museums who increasingly collected contemporary art. Furthermore, new actors appeared on the scene, such as auction houses and corporate art collections. Businesses started to buy or commission contemporary art in order to embellish their employees’ offices or show it to a wider public. Belonging to this latter group are also non-profit institutions such as hospitals, which embraced art as part of their medical philosophy. Finally, artists and galleries were confronted with new expectations and adjusted their art and strategies to this new situation by incorporating, avoiding or refuting these narratives.

All these changes created the need for new legitimations that took the form of narratives, invented to justify the act of collecting for individuals, institutions and governments. It could also lead to counter-narratives, in the form of an art that defied the market, as in the case of (early) Arte Povera. These narratives also have implications for how then and now art was and is defined. This workshop aims to explore these narratives and their dynamics, by mapping the various motives formulated by actors in the field of collecting between 1945 and the early 2000s, in order to explore in what ways the act of collection adapted to the ideologies of the post-war era.

Programme:
14:00 to 19:00

Jim Carter (American Academy in Rome):
-Industry, Culture and the New Humanism in Postwar Italy: The Case of Il Menabò – Jim Carter

Sara Piccinini (Collezione Maramotti)
-Collezione Maramotti. An out of fashion art collecting

Sabrina Kamstra (Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam)
-Why collecting for an Academical medical center?

Monika Kackovic (University of Amsterdam)
-Identify with your employer? You probably like the Art: A study on identity orientations and organizational non-core activities

Jan de Groot (University of Amsterdam)
-History for legitimacy: how curators of corporate art collections explain their acquisition decisions

Francesca Gallo (Università di Roma La Sapienza)
-Interview with Giuseppe Garrera on collecting

Job: 2 Wiss. Mitarb. “Provenienzforschung: Enteignungskontexte von Kulturguetern” (Stiftung Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin)

Stiftung Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin, 01.02.2019
Bewerbungsschluss: 04.01.2019

1.) Wiss. Mitarb. “Enteignungskontexte von Kulturgütern in SBZ und DDR”

Bei der Stiftung Deutsches Historisches Museum ist ab dem 1. Februar 2019 die Stelle eines/r wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiters/in für Provenienzforschung mit dem Schwerpunkt zum Forschungsbereich “Enteignungskontexte von Kulturgütern in SBZ und DDR” in der Abteilung Sammlungen zu besetzen.

Die Stelle ist unbefristet und nach Entgeltgruppe 13 TVöD-Ost bewertet.

Dienstort ist Berlin-Mitte.
Das Aufgabengebiet umfasst im Wesentlichen:
– Dokumentation der Provenienzmerkmale des Sammlungsbestandes in der hausinternen Objektdatenbank
– Eingehende Untersuchung unterschiedlicher Objektgattungen auf Verdachtshinweise
– Vertiefte Recherchen bei Verdachtshinweisen
– Begutachtung bei Neuerwerbungen
– Mitarbeit bei der Vermittlung der Methoden und der Ergebnisse der Provenienzforschung Folgende Anforderungen werden gestellt:
– Abgeschlossenes wissenschaftliches Hochschulstudium in Neuerer und Neuesten Geschichte oder der Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt im 20. Jahrhundert
– Nachweisbare, langjährige Erfahrung in der Provenienzforschung an kulturhistorischen Museen, insbesondere zu Provenienzen aus der SBZ und DDR
– Mehrjährige Erfahrung in der Ausstellungs- oder Sammlungstätigkeit eines Museums
– Grundkenntnisse der Enteignungskontexte in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus
– Vertiefte Kenntnisse in der Recherche zu Objekten (idealerweise unterschiedlicher Objektgattungen) ohne prominente Urheberschaft und Provenienz
– Vertiefte Kenntnisse im Bereich der Geschichte  der Sowjetischen Besatzungszone und der DDR (Strukturen, Gesetze, Kunst- und Antiquitätenhandel)

Wünschenswert sind:

– Promotion
– Englischkenntnisse in Wort und Schrift
– Kommunikationsfähigkeit
– Teamfähigkeit, Einsatzbereitschaft

Bei gleicher Eignung, Befähigung und fachlicher Leistung werden Frauen nach dem Bundesgleichstellungsgesetz, schwerbehinderte Menschen nach Maßgabe des Sozialgesetzbuches IX besonders berücksichtigt.

Bitte richten Sie Ihre aussagekräftige Bewerbung mit Lebenslauf und Arbeits- und sonstigen Zeugnissen und anderen Bewertungen sowie Unterlagen bis zum 4. Januar 2019 mit der Kennziffer: Prov_2 ausschließlich elektronisch an: bewerbung@dhm.de.

Bewerbungen in elektronischer Form sollten aus technischen Gründen eine Größe von 8 MB nicht überschreiten und in einer einzigen pdf-Datei gesendet werden.

2.) Wiss. Mitarb. “NS-verfolgungsbedingter Entzug von Kulturgütern”

Bei der Stiftung Deutsches Historisches Museum ist ab dem 1. Februar 2019 die Stelle eines/r wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiters/in für Provenienzforschung mit dem Schwerpunkt zum Forschungsbereich “NS-verfolgungsbedingter Entzug von Kulturgütern” in der Abteilung Sammlungen zu besetzen.

Die Stelle ist unbefristet und nach Entgeltgruppe 13 TVöD-Ost bewertet.

Dienstort ist Berlin-Mitte.
Das Aufgabengebiet umfasst im Wesentlichen:
– Dokumentation der Provenienzmerkmale des Sammlungsbestandes in der hausinternen Objektdatenbank
– Eingehende Untersuchung unterschiedlicher Objektgattungen auf Verdachtshinweise
– Vertiefte Recherchen bei Verdachtshinweisen
– Begutachtung bei Neuerwerbungen
– Mitarbeit bei der Vermittlung der Methoden und der Ergebnisse der Provenienzforschung

Folgende Anforderungen werden gestellt:
– Abgeschlossenes wissenschaftliches Hochschulstudium in Neuerer und Neuesten Geschichte oder der Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt im 20. Jahrhundert
– Nachweisbare, langjährige Erfahrung in der Provenienzforschung an kulturhistorischen Museen, insbesondere zu NS-verfolgungsbedingt entzogenem Kulturgut
– Mehrjährige Erfahrung in der Ausstellungs- oder Sammlungstätigkeit eines Museums
– Grundkenntnisse der Enteignungskontexte in der Sowjetische Besatzungszone und der DDR
– Vertiefte Kenntnisse in der Recherche zu Objekten (idealerweise unterschiedlicher Objektgattungen) ohne prominente Urheberschaft und Provenienz
– Vertiefte Kenntnisse im Bereich der NS-Geschichte (Strukturen, Gesetze, Kunsthandel) und der Nachkriegsgeschichte

Wünschenswert sind:

– Promotion
– Englischkenntnisse in Wort und Schrift
– Kommunikationsfähigkeit
– Teamfähigkeit, Einsatzbereitschaft

Bei gleicher Eignung, Befähigung und fachlicher Leistung werden Frauen nach dem Bundesgleichstellungsgesetz, schwerbehinderte Menschen nach Maßgabe des Sozialgesetzbuches IX besonders berücksichtigt.

Bitte richten Sie Ihre aussagekräftige Bewerbung mit Lebenslauf und Arbeits- und sonstigen Zeugnissen und anderen Bewertungen sowie Unterlagen bis zum 4. Januar 2019 mit der Kennziffer: Prov_1 ausschließlich elektronisch an: bewerbung@dhm.de.

Bewerbungen in elektronischer Form sollten aus technischen Gründen eine Größe von 8 MB nicht überschreiten und in einer einzigen pdf-Datei gesendet werden.

JOB: Lecturer, Antiquities Trafficking & Art Crime, University of Glasgow

The University of Glasgow is seeking a Lecturer to contribute to teaching master’s-level topics in Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime at the University of Glasgow. This position is part time (60%) and is funded for at least the next five years, and will be based in the subject of sociology/criminology, specifically in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research.

Please see: https://www22.i-grasp.com/fe/tpl_glasgow01.asp?newms=jj&id=97155&newlang=1

Applicants must:

  • Have a PhD in a related discipline (criminology, sociology, archaeology, heritage studies, law, etc)
  • Have demonstrable expertise in some aspect of antiquities trafficking, art or heritage crime, heritage repatriation, or cultural property law
  • Have a strong interest in online teaching and distance learning, preferably with online teaching experience
  • Be comfortable in a digital environment using online tools and helping students do the same
  • Be based in Glasgow (visas can be supported for this role in many circumstances)

Ideally, the successful applicant would start in January, although some provision can be made for a particularly strong candidate. Glasgow has a vibrant student and research community focused on this topic and we hope that this will form the basis for future research collaboration.

Please email, Donna Yates (donna.yates@glasgow.ac.uk), for more information about this position.

ANN: Exhibiting (and) History (Rome, 6-7 Dec 18)

Rome, Bibliotheca Hertziana – Max Planck Institute for Art History, December 6 – 07, 2018

Workshop

Concept and organization: Maria Bremer (Bibliotheca Hertziana)

Conceived within the framework of the research initiative “Rome Contemporary,” this workshop will be aimed at developing novel perspectives on the relationship between exhibition practice and history from 1960 to the present. The encounter intends to address this relationship by focusing on postwar and contemporary examples worldwide, proposing both a historical and a methodological reflection. Especially since the postwar time, as the understanding of art has been expanded to include artistic practices beyond singular artworks, exhibitions too experienced significant transformations. Hitherto mainly object-based, they diversified into a range of discursive, contextual, and performative formats grounded in modes of acting rather than just modes of showing. These processual and activating formats engage more firmly with a broader social nexus, weaving themselves into the processes and contingencies involved in the making of history. Thereby, they draw our attention to the capacity of exhibitions to both mediate and impact their historical time, to spatialize or enact historical concepts, and, in so doing, to potentially offer new models for historiographical work.

The list of participants speaks to the broad disciplinary scope of the workshop: Louisa Avgita (University of Ioannina), Raffaele Bedarida (Cooper Union, New York), Ana Bilbao (Afterall Research Centre, London), Beatrice von Bismarck (Academy of Visual Arts Leipzig), Ana Bogdanović (University of Belgrade), Nanne Buurman (Kunsthochschule Kassel), Eleonora Charans (IUAV University, Venice), Davor Ereš (University of Belgrade), Flavio Fergonzi (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa), Anthony Gardner (University of Oxford), Jonida Gashi (Academy of Albanian Studies, Tirana), Kristian Handberg (University of Copenhagen), Sharon Hecker (Independent), Britta Hochkirchen (Bielefeld University), Catalina Imizcoz (Central Saint Martins, London), Vincent Normand (ECAL/University of Art and Design Lausanne), Vanessa Parent (University of British Columbia, Vancouver), Clarissa Ricci (IUAV University, Venice), and Simon Sheikh (Goldsmiths College, London). By convening such a diverse group of scholars, we mean to start a conversation around an expanded notion of exhibiting as entangled in and impacting the historical conditions of its time, and – not least importantly – to re-examine the ways in which art historical research can contribute to the broader field of exhibition studies.

——

PROGRAM

Thursday, December 6, 2018

10:00 – Welcome (Tristan Weddigen)

10:10 – Introduction (Maria Bremer)

10:30-13:00 – Session I

Beginning with the attempt to locate the exhibition historically, we will discuss its roots in western modernity (Vincent Normand), retracing, in a second step, its currently decreasing specificity and unsettled future (Ana Bilbao). After situating our object of inquiry, our aim will be to concentrate on the ways in which – since the postwar time – exhibition practice has mediated events of contemporary history. By modulating or adjusting their structure, function, format, as well as the form and canon of their individual exhibits, exhibitions have responded or reacted to episodes of their time, such as the protests of 1968 (Clarissa Ricci) or Cold War politics (Kristian Handberg; Britta Hochkirchen).

13:00 – Lunch

14:00-15:30 – Session II

Moving beyond the mediating relationship of exhibitions to history, what will be at stake, then, is their increasing agency in constructing the (art history of the) present, by establishing or disseminating categories of relevance through formats ranging from biennials (Ana Bogdanović/Davor Ereš) to private gallery exhibitions (Flavio Fergonzi).

15:30 – Break

16:00-18:00 – Session III

Delving deeper into curatorial poetics, we will further highlight the aptitude of exhibitions to translate preexisting concepts of history, from universalizing to genealogic and nostalgic models, into the expository realm (Nanne Buurman). Conversely, a philosophy of the present as ‘the contemporary’ has recently been founded at a global scale through a specific, constellational and trans-historical exhibition practice (Louisa Avgita). Elucidating how the philosophy of ‘the contemporary’ has rendered linear and teleological patterns obsolete will then lead us to focus on the current state of scholarly historiographical work.

Friday, December 7, 2018

10:00 – Introduction (Maria Bremer)

10:30-12:30 – Session IV

At once attempting to anticipate future trajectories, we will ask whether expository practices could possibly offer new models for historiographical methods. Since their early feminist (Vanessa Parent) and postcolonial (Catalina Imizcoz) declinations, exhibitions have called into question conventional, hegemonic historiographies. Their participation in the rewriting of history can be further examined by looking at a widespread phenomenon, the reconstruction of exhibitions. We will discuss how such techniques of repetition, enacted in the exhibition medium, resonate with assumptions of curatorial evidence production (Beatrice Von Bismarck), to then dwell on the various effects of expository re-stagings (Eleonora Charans).

12:30 – Lunch

13:30-15:00 – Session V

In the context of expository reenactments, it appears that privately funded recreations of fascist exhibitions (Raffaele Bedarida/Sharon Hecker), or state-driven, public presentations of political archives (Jonida Gashi) urge us to refine our investigation of exhibition practice and its spheres of impact.

15:00 – Break

15:30-18:00 – Session VI

In our concluding session we will thus proceed to discuss viable ways of revisiting the “undisciplined” (Anthony Gardner) realm of exhibition history. By disentangling its categories; reassessing the impact of documentary records (and the lack thereof) (Gardner); or acquiring instruments from conceptual and social history (Simon Sheikh), the discipline can progress beyond the ongoing canonization of ‘curator-authors’ and ‘masterpieces.’

The workshop will be held in English. Participants will engage in group discussion, after each gives a brief presentation about their respective topics. No registration required. See the program at: http://www.biblhertz.it/en/news/event-calendar/