STIP: Center for the History of Collecting Fellowships, The Frick Collection, New York

Application deadline: 09 February 2018

The Center’s Scholars’ Program encompasses both short and long-term fellowships. Through its fellowships, the Center provides support for both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research. Fellowship proposals may address wide-ranging aspects of the history of collecting in the United States from Colonial times to the present as well as in Europe. Proposals may focus on individual collectors, dealers, developments, or trends in the art market. Interdisciplinary research is especially encouraged.

Four short-term fellowships, currently supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, are awarded every year, each for a period of eight to ten weeks. Two semester-long Leon Levy Fellowships are awarded to scholars engaged on a major project.

Application forms for Summer/Fall 2018 fellowships must be e-mailed no later than February 9, 2018. https://www.frick.org/research/center/fellowships

Save the Date: Susanne Kessler Studio Visit (Berlin, 27 Jan, 2018)

Next TIAMSA  Berlin Event

Susanne Kessler Studio visit

Saturday, January 27, 2018, 3pm 

TIAMSA members, potential members and their guests are invited to the studio of Susanne Kessler, a widely exhibited painter and installation artist. http://www.susannekessler.de

The artist will talk about her experiences and views on today’s art market.

To book your place please RSVP to Christine Howald.

We are very much looking forward to seeing you again at the end of January!

CONF: Art Dealers, America and the Art Market (Los Angeles, 18-19 Jan 18)

Los Angeles, CA
The Getty, 1200 Getty Center Drive
January 18 – 19, 2018

Art Dealers, America and the International Art Market, 1880-1930

 

The Getty Research Institute presents a symposium on the role of international art dealers in creating the collections, museums, and intellectual culture of the American art world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Bringing together rich archival resources from the Getty Research Institute and peer institutions, and capitalizing on new methodologies made possible by the extraordinary quantity of information contained in the documentary record, this symposium illuminates the ways in which art dealers contributed to making America a prominent arena in the international art market, and their role in creating the major private collections that became the foundation of great American museums. Continue reading “CONF: Art Dealers, America and the Art Market (Los Angeles, 18-19 Jan 18)”

L: Raphael for Prince Eugene of Savoy (Vienna, 13 Dec,17)

Raphael for Prince Eugene of Savoy: The Oeuvre in the Albertina, Its Provenance and the Role of the Mariette
Lecture by Antoinette Friedenthal

 

13 December 2017, 6.15pm

Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Universitätscampus Hof 9
Seminarraum 1
Garnisongasse 13
1090 Vienna

The genesis of Prince Eugene of Savoy’s outstanding  collection of prints has hardly been researched so far. One of its most prized holdings, particularly coveted by the Prince, is an extensive Raphael oeuvre (today in the Albertina), consisting of seven large folio volumes that contain the prints after Raphael by contemporary and later engravers. Like the bulk of the collection, the Raphael oeuvre had been assembled and catalogued in 1717/18 by the Parisian bookseller, publisher and print dealer Jean Mariette in cooperation with his now more famous son Pierre-Jean Mariette. The lecture by Antoinette Friedenthal – who is currently preparing an annotated edition of the correspondence between Jean Mariette and Pierre-Jean Mariette, 1717-1719 – will explore this important chapter in the history of connoisseurship.

Link: http://kunstgeschichte.univie.ac.at/einzelansicht/news/raffael-fuer-prinz-eugen-das-oeuvre-in-der-albertina-seine-provenienz-und-die-rolle-der-mariette/

ANN: Digital Repository of the French Art Market (1940-1944)

The digital Repository of the French art market during the German occupation (1940-1944) is a joint Franco-German research project with the aim of creating a directory of persons who were involved in the international trade of artworks looted by the National Socialists in France, and tracing their networks. Comprehensive information will be collected, together with references to further archival records relating to individual actors. In this context, cooperation with other provenance researchers is crucial.

Please contact

Dr. Elisabeth Furtwängler
e.furtwaengler@tu-berlin.de
+49 (0) 30 314 2501

The project is supported by TU Berlin, the DZK and the INHA.

TOC: Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6, 3 (Fall 2017)

Visualizing Networks: Approaches to Network Analysis in Art History

Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6, 3 (Fall 2017)

Guest Editor : Miriam KIENLE

Sommaire / Content :

Between Nodes and Edges: Possibilities and Limits of Network Analysis in Art History
Miriam Kienle

Continuity and Disruption in European Networks of Print Production, 1550-1750
Matthew D. Lincoln

Keeping Our Eyes Open: Visualizing networks and art history
Stephanie Porras

Workshop as Network: A Case Study from Mughal South Asia
Yael Rice

Network Analysis and Feminist Artists
Michelle Moravec

The Computer as Filter Machine: A Clustering Approach to Categorize Artworks Based on a Social Tagging Network
Stefanie Schneider and Hubertus Kohle

Enriching and Cutting: How to Visualize Networks Thanks to Linked Open Data Platforms
Léa Saint-Raymond and Antoine Courtin

What You See Is What You Get: The “Artifice of Insight.” A Conversation between R. Luke DuBois and Anne Collins Goodyear
Anne C. Goodyear

Digital Art History “Beyond the Digitized Slide Library”: An Interview with Johanna Drucker and Miriam Posner
Miriam Kienle

The Artl@s Bulletin (ISSN 2264-2668) is a peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary journal devoted to spatial and transnational questions in the history of the arts, published by the ENS and the CNRS in partnership with Purdue Publishing at: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/artlas/

For more information on the aims and scope of the Artl@s Bulletin, please see the About the Journal page, and feel free to contact the editors, Catherine Dossin (cdossin@purdue.edu) and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel (beatrice.joyeux-prunel@ens.fr).

Reference: TOC: Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6, 3 (Fall 2017): Visualizing Networks. In: ArtHist.net, Dec 1, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16874>.

Read this: Art by the Many, London Style Cults of the 1960s

in: British Art Studies, 7

Art by the Many is a “Conversation Piece” – a British Art Studies series that draws together a group of contributors to respond to an idea, provocation, or question. The conversation, this one put together by Thomas Crow, will develop as more respondents enter the debate. Readers can also join in by adding a response.