PUB: Caterina Caputo, Collezionismo e mercato. La London Gallery e la diffusione dell’arte surrealista, Florence: Pontecorboli, 2018.

Research on the art market related to the avant-garde remains still largely unexplored today. The author of the present book aims to contribute to this field through a study of collecting, art market strategies, and networks that fostered and sustained Surrealism in the interwar and post-war periods in Britain. The volume focuses on the London Gallery, the only Surrealist gallery to be active in England since the end of the 1930s. It was managed by two Surrealist artists who were also collectors: the Belgian E.L.T. Mesens and the British Roland Penrose. The London Gallery opened in 1938, two years after the significant International Surrealist Exhibition held at the New Burlington Galleries in London, an exhibition followed by the foundation of the Surrealist British group.

Continue reading “PUB: Caterina Caputo, Collezionismo e mercato. La London Gallery e la diffusione dell’arte surrealista, Florence: Pontecorboli, 2018.”

PUB: “From Florence to London to New York: J.P. Morgan’s Bronze Doors,” Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, vol. 16, no. 3, Autum by Lynn Catterson

This article, based on recently discovered material in several archives, tells the story of the bronze doors of the Morgan Library.[1] It narrates the travel of the allegedly Renaissance bronze doors from their acquisition in Florence in 1901, to their brief sojourn in London before arriving in New York to adorn the principal façade of McKim, Mead & White’s building. This case study also addresses the attribution of the work to Thomas Waldo Story (1855–1915) and analyzes his position within the complex social microcosm of the art market in which the acquisition of J. Pierpont Morgan’s doors took place.

Continue reading “PUB: “From Florence to London to New York: J.P. Morgan’s Bronze Doors,” Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, vol. 16, no. 3, Autum by Lynn Catterson”

TOC: Journal of the History of Collections, Vol. 31, Issue 1

Articles:

Cardinal Paluzzo Paluzzi degli Albertoni Altieri and his collection in the Palazzo Altieri: the evidence of the 1698 death inventory, Part II
Lisa Beaven; Karen J Lloyd

Continue reading “TOC: Journal of the History of Collections, Vol. 31, Issue 1”

ANN: Wildenstein Plattner Institute: unlimited access to publications

As part of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute’s mission to promote the accessibility of art historical information, the Wildenstein Plattner Institute is pleased to provide free, unlimited access to publications created under the sponsorship of the historic Wildenstein Institute. These newly-digitized materials, which have long served as invaluable printed resources for the art historical community, are now viewable on the screens of your computer, tablet or smart phone.

To consult the WPI’s holdings of dozens of digitized artists’ monographs and catalogue raisonnés, including the four-volume catalogue raisonné of Claude Monet by Daniel Wildenstein, please visit our website at wpi.art/publications.  

Happy browsing!

PUB: “The effect of experts’ opinion on prices of art works: The case of Peter Brueghel the Younger” by Victor Ginsburgh (ECARES Université libre de Bruxelles) ; Anne-Sophie Radermecker (Université libre de Bruxelles) ; Denni Tommasi (Monash University)

Journal: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Volume 159, March 2019, Pages 36-50

Continue reading “PUB: “The effect of experts’ opinion on prices of art works: The case of Peter Brueghel the Younger” by Victor Ginsburgh (ECARES Université libre de Bruxelles) ; Anne-Sophie Radermecker (Université libre de Bruxelles) ; Denni Tommasi (Monash University)”

PUB: ‘How to become a judgment device: valuation practices and the role of auctions in the emerging Chinese art market’, Socio-Economic Review, 16 (3), 2018, pp. 459-477 by Svetlana Kharchenkova & Olav Velthuis

We are very happy to let you know about this publication by Svetlana Kharchenkova & Olav Velthuis!

This article studies the role of judgment devices in the emergence of markets for singularities. In particular, it seeks to understand how specific judgment devices become dominant in resolving uncertainty within these markets. Building on Karpik’s seminal theory, we argue that institutional environments (e.g. government regulations, political-economic factors, the level of informality within business environments) as well as the level of expertise of consumers, co-determine which devices come to be used in new markets. Empirically, we focus on the emerging market for contemporary art in China. While auctions and auction prices are widely used in valuing contemporary art in China, this is highly illegitimate in international art markets. We argue that auctions act as a judgment device in China because of strong government backing, because other validating organizations, such as museums and art critics, are seen as untrustworthy, and because auctions send strong, easily interpretable signals to novice collectors.

More information can be found here!