CONF: Morgan: Mind of the Collector (Hartford, 10-11 Nov 17)

Morgan: Mind of the Collector

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT, November 10 – 11, 2017

Edward J. Steichen, J. Pierpont Morgan, Esq., Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949, © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

J. Pierpont Morgan (1837–1913) spent over twenty years travelling the globe to amass the largest collection of art and cultural artifacts of his time. Estimated to have exceeded 20,000 works of art, Morgan’s collections represent a broad historical and geographic range of art and cultural artifacts. Acting on his father’s wishes, J.P. Morgan’s son, Jack, donated more than 1,350 works collected by his father to the Wadsworth Atheneum in his native Hartford.  In fall 2017, the Wadsworth Atheneum will mark the centennial anniversary of Morgan’s  gift and its historical impact with an exhibition, Morgan: Mind of the Collector.
The Wadsworth Atheneum will host an international symposium in conjunction with the exhibition to reexamine and showcase the latest research about Morgan’s collection and how he shaped the identity of the collector in the modern age. Continue reading “CONF: Morgan: Mind of the Collector (Hartford, 10-11 Nov 17)”

Call for Sessions: Art and its directions, AAANZ (Perth)

The Conference Committee would like to invite proposals for panel sessions for the AAANZ 2017 Conference in Perth.

The deadline for session proposals is COB Monday 22 May 2017

Please see the submission instructions below. All enquiries to conf@aaanz.info.

This year’s conference theme Art and its Directions is broadly conceived against the backdrop of debates relating to national sovereignty and globalisation. Rather than purely a focus on politically based art in this context, we turn to the question of directions in art, where directions refer both to geography and chronology. The aim is to investigate artistic production and exchange in relation to the geographical, conceptual and imaginative relationships between north, south, east and west, so as to encompass discussion of transnational and global art histories; and the binaries of centre and periphery, modern and traditional. The theme takes account of the conference location in Western Australia – ranging from perceptions of the west to its distinct collections, and history.

There is also focus upon how art objects and art practices exist in different spatial and temporal contexts. This may include discussion of the mobility of objects and the materials of art, and of curatorial practices relating to the display of works of art.

Convenors of panel sessions might consider subject areas such as:

  • The theorising of geographies in relation to art
  • Art and the changing history of place
  • Landscapes, travel and the sensory dimension of place
  • Heritage, nostalgia and anachronism in art
  • Contemporary curatorial practice and its global aspects
  • Indigenous art and cultural objects in their original settings and in the museum
  • The legacy of colonialism in historical and contemporary art practice
  • Emigré and refugee artists, and cross-cultural exchange
  • Representations of the cosmos, and the mapping of sea and land in Aboriginal art
  • Aboriginal rock art and cross-cultural encounters
  • Art and cartography, navigation, travel and trade
  • The translocation of art through commercial forces and war
  • The mobility of images in the digital age, including the role of photography
  • The space of the studio and its relation to the outer world

Continue reading “Call for Sessions: Art and its directions, AAANZ (Perth)”

CfP: Art on the Move – Mobility in the Long Nineteenth Century, Jan 2018, Birmingham

Friday 12 and Saturday 13 January 2018, Barber Institute, University of Birmingham

Conference Organisers: Kate Nichols (Birmingham) and Barbara Pezzini (Manchester)

Keynote Speakers: Pamela Fletcher and Tapati Guha Thakurta

Call for Papers Now Open

In the nineteenth century the circulation of works of art developed into its recognisably modern form. The forces of increasingly globalized capitalism, imperial routes and new means of transport, coupled with the growing reach of advertising and the press caused an unprecedented movement of artists, goods and materials. Larger audiences for art in newly founded museums and galleries across the world also contributed to, and benefitted from, this increased mobility of art.

Nineteenth-century mobility still awaits a thorough art historical investigation. This two-day conference aims to map, examine and problematize this emerging field. What is distinctive about the nineteenth-century circulation of art objects? How does mobility impact upon the modes of art production? Does it engender new subjects and materials? How important is the mobility of art to nineteenth-century art history? What impact does such transnational exchange have on national narratives of art? How are imbalances of power involved and developed through the mobility of art? How do the different networks of mobility – social, commercial and cultural – intersect? Which methodological approaches are best suited to this area of investigation?

The conference will be divided into principal thematic sessions, and we invite paper proposals of case studies or broader analyses that address some aspects of these interlinked beams:

  • networks of production
  • networks of cultural exchange
  • networks of commerce
  • networks of reception.

Potential topics may include: Visualising mobility and networks, mobility of people/objects, reproduction, replication and mobility, the ethics of mobility, enforced mobility, the role of art markets, refusal to move, and methodological approaches to mobility.

The conference will coincide with an exhibition dedicated to the works of Birmingham born engraver, miniature portraitist and photographer Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855) at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham. In 1823 Bock was found guilty of “administering concoctions of certain herbs … with the intent to cause miscarriage” and was transported to the Australian penal colony of Van Diemens Land, where he was pressed into service as a convict artist. Bock’s artistic output includes portraits of Tasmanian Aborigines, his fellow criminals as well as free settlers in Hobart Town. Many of these images returned to Britain, although Bock himself remained in Australia until his death in 1855. This is the first exhibition dedicated to Bock’s work to be held in Britain. An evening reception will be held at Ikon, with a private view of the exhibition and curatorial reflections on exhibiting the circulation of artists and their work.

Please send paper proposals of a maximum length of 250 words, accompanied by a 150 words biography, by Friday 31 March 2017 to artonthemove19@gmail.com 

Art on the Move