CFP: NCAW Terra-funded digital humanities publishing initiative

Terra-funded digital humanities publishing initiative
Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide
Deadline: Nov 16, 2018

The peer-reviewed open-access journal Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (NCAW) is pleased to circulate information regarding a digital humanities publishing initiative supported by a grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. The editors of NCAW are accepting proposals for articles addressing art and visual culture of the United States in the long nineteenth century, from the American Revolution to World War I. NCAW seeks proposals that take full advantage of the potential of digital publishing by using digital technologies in the article’s research or publication phase, or both. Strong proposals will demonstrate how the production of digital tool(s) and/or components will lead to a scholarly argument’s key insights (either the tool/component enhanced the depth of insight or made it possible) and/or will illustrate aspects of that argument in dynamic/interactive ways. Continue reading “CFP: NCAW Terra-funded digital humanities publishing initiative”

Book Out Now: Peter Carpreau, The Value of Taste

The Value of Taste
Auction Prices and the Evolution of Taste in Dutch and
Flemish Golden Age Painting (1642–2011)

by Peter Carpreau

TIAMSA members receive a 25% discount and free shipping on the book upon check out until 31 March 2018.
Please go to the MEMBERS ONLY Area to see all T&Cs. 

Collectors and Dealers Series (HMCD 3)

approx. 295 p., 82 b/w tables, 220 x 280 mm, 2017
ISBN: 978-1-909400-48-1
Languages: English
HardbackHardback
The publication is available.The publication is available.
Retail price: EUR 110,00 excl. tax

Taste is a well known but largely underestimated phenomenon. Yet it is one of the factors that has shaped our knowledge and view of art. Why is Rembrandt van Rijn today considered to be one of the greatest painters in European art while Gerard de Lairesse, Rembrandt’s younger contemporary and one of the best-selling painters of his day, is now forgotten?

Continue reading “Book Out Now: Peter Carpreau, The Value of Taste”

CFP: Digital Humanities for Academic and Curatorial Practice (Rome, 23 – 24 May 18)

Biblioteca Angelica di Roma and American Academy in Rome
Italy
May 23 – 24, 2018

Deadline: Mar 1, 2018

DIGITAL HUMANITIES FOR ACADEMIC AND CURATORIAL PRACTICE

The Digital Humanities have challenged all disciplines of Art History to engage with new interdisciplinary methodologies, learn new tools, and re-evaluate their role within academia. In consequence, art historians occupy a new position in relation to the object of study. Museums have been equally transformed. The possibilities of creating virtual realities for lost/inaccessible monuments poses a new relationship between viewer and object in gallery spaces. Digital Humanities interventions in museums even allow us to preserve the memory of endangered global heritage sites which cease to exist or are inaccessible (celebrated examples including the lost Great Arch of Palmyra reconstructed with a 3D printer). Curatorial practices are now trending towards a sensorial and experiential approach. Continue reading “CFP: Digital Humanities for Academic and Curatorial Practice (Rome, 23 – 24 May 18)”

@CAA: Christian Huemer, Chair: Exploring Art Markets of the Past

EXPLORING ART MARKETS OF THE PAST: TOOLS AND METHODS IN THE AGE OF “BIG DATA”

CAA Session

Time: 02/16/2017: 8:30AM–10:00AM
Location: Gramercy A/West, 2nd Floor

Chair: Christian Huemer, Getty Research Institute

The Virtual Exploration of an Eighteenth-Century Gallery Space: Gersaint, Watteau, and the Pont Notre Dame
Sophie Raux, Université Lumière-Lyon 2

Materials and Techniques in the Dutch Market for Elite Genre Painting
Melanie Gifford, National Gallery of Art; Lisha Deming Glinsman, National Gallery of Art

Artist-Collectors in Nineteenth-Century New York: Correcting for Path Dependency and Sample Bias in the History of Collecting
Diana Seave Greenwald, University of Oxford

Methodological Reflections on Missing Data
Koenraad Brosens, University of Leuven

Discussant: Matthew Lincoln, Getty Research Institute

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SUBJECT AREAS