CAA Professional-Development Fellowship program

The College Art Association’s Professional-Development Fellowship program offers two $10,000 fellowships each year—one to a visual artist and one to an art historian, each who are completing their graduate studies in 2018 (either fall or spring). The awards are a one-time, unrestricted grant designed to further the recipient’s professional development.

Art Historian Deadline – October 2, 2017

Visual Artists Deadline – November 10, 2017

Fellowship award amount: $10,000 each

Learn more about eligibility and the application process for CAA’s Professional-Development Fellowship.

“I remember sitting in my graduate school studio applying for the award. I was day-dreaming about how it could help me be a self-sustaining artist and maybe start my career in teaching. A few months later I received notification of the award and I’m happy to say the grant has helped me enormously with both of my day-dreams, artistic and academic. CAA’s Professional Development-Fellowship for Visual Artists has stabilized a shaky phase of my career and life, continuing an artistic practice after graduate school. The award funds helped me to kick-start my studio space, travel for photography research, and secure teaching positions right out of graduate school. CAA’s support of developing visual artists is certainly outstanding and to an even greater extent, appreciated. I’m happy to now be a CAA member and encourage others to apply for the fellowship without hesitation.” —Daniel Krauss, 2016 Professional-Development Fellowship Recipient

For art historians, the fellowship is intended to support graduate students and scholars in art, architecture, and/or design historian, curator, or critic who are conducting research in their final year to complete their PhD. The award can help with various aspects of his/her work, whether for job-search expenses, image license fees, or other publishing costs. Applications are due October 2, 2017, 5:00 pm.

For visual artists, the fellowship is intended to support those in MFA or other terminal degree programs in visual arts. The fellowship is to assist them with various aspects of their work, as an artist, designer and/or craftsperson, whether it be for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for their studio art/design practice. Applications are due November 10, 2017, 5:00 pm.

CAA initiated its fellowship program in 1993 to help student artists and art historians bridge the gap between their graduate studies and professional careers.

CFP: ’68 and After; CAA Call for Session

’68 and After: Art and Political Engagement in Europe

EPCAF Sponsored Session
Submission Deadline: August 14, 2017

Chairs: Jenevive Nykolak (University of Rochester) and Maria Elena Versari (Carnegie Mellon University)

The events that swept Europe in 1968 have, without fail, occasioned successive waves of commemoration and contestation as subsequent generations struggle to articulate their significance under changing historical circumstances. While scholars have begun to look beyond a narrow focus on the student revolts to highlight immigrant perspectives, issues of gender and sexuality, third-world liberation struggles, relations to labor movements, and developments outside of urban centers, art historians have been slow to enter into these debates. On the fiftieth anniversary of the events, this panel seeks to respond to this ongoing reassessment of ’68 and its aftermath and to reexamine its legacy within art history. Which artistic currents embodied the protest ethos and political commitments of the time? What were the immediate and long-term effects of artists’ engagement with artistic institutions? Continue reading “CFP: ’68 and After; CAA Call for Session”

Read this: ARTISTS’ LEGACIES UNPACKED in ART JOURNAL

“What to do with all the stuff?” This is one of many questions posed—and provisionally answered—in the most recent issue of Art Journal, in an extensive multiauthor forum that delves into the complex matter of artists’ estates. “The Politics of Legacy,” guest-edited for the journal by Rachel Middleman and Anne Monahan, comprises contributions by no fewer than twenty-one artists and scholars. The texts include interviews (with, for example, Flavin and Rainer Judd, Mira Friedlaender, and Jane Kallir of Grandma Moses Properties, Inc.) and position papers (by Caroline A. Jones, Michael Corris, and Nancy J. Troy, among others). Central to the forum are three commissioned artists’ projects by Danh Vo (on the estate of Martin Wong), Mimi Gross (the estate of her father Chaim Gross, as well as her own legacy as an artist), and Jill Magid (the contested estate of the Mexican architect Luis Barragán).

Artists Legacies Unpacked – CAA News