Symposium: Art as Commodity – Kunst wird Ware, April 27, Hamburg

Symposium zur Ausstellung „Kunst wird Ware. Die Geburt des Kunstmarktes im Goldenen Zeitalter der Niederlande“

27. April 2017, 10 bis 17.30 Uhr

Bucerius Kunst Forum, Rathausmarkt 2, 20095 Hamburg

Ridiculous prices, greedy traders, exaggerated artists: the adverse impact of today’s art market seems ubiquitous. And yet the trade is a form of social engagement with art and thus an essential condition of its existence. Talk about art and art markets originated long before there were museums. The birthplace of art trade was the Netherlands of the 17th century. While commissions by nobility and the church stagnated, the increasingly wealthy bourgeoisie was able to afford oil paintings for the first time. Following the demands of the new market, the motifs as well as the techniques changed. Histories and mythological scenes were still life, landscapes and genre images. Prices ranged from a few guilders to vast sums.

This symposium [held in German] sets the scene for the exhibition, September 23, 2017 – Jan 7, 2018.
Free tickets for students are available at BKF counter in advance, but are limited.

 

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Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market

In this blog, our member Dr. Anne Luther, a researcher and software developer at The Center for Data Arts at The New School and for Professor Boris Groys at NYU, questions some of the recent practices by speculating collectors looking to make quick profits from the market of contemporary art. A similar call to blacklist so-called flippers was recently made by Thaddaus Ropac at the Barcelona Talking Galleries Conference (16-17 January 2017).

Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market (pdf., 109kB)

A plea for a more sustainable art market
by Anne Luther

New York is the center of the international contemporary art market. [footnote 1] Local actors are tightly interconnected, and one can understand strategies and mechanisms of the market in a much more traceable way than in anywhere else. The city has major museums and institutions; the significant auction houses host their ‘record auctions’ here; the most successful galleries are surrounded by an unparalleled density of galleries; and art fairs, art magazines, and art schools are abundant. The network of people working in this local art world is therefore incomparable to other cities: artists, artist assistants, art handlers, writers, art advisors, curators, gallerists and their staff are part of a tightly knit and highly social network that spans art production and collecting. Private collectors have a major influence in this network and have changed the art market in the past five years significantly.
The following will describe the most notable mechanisms responsible for a change in art production in this time period. I will use the term emerging to point to actors in the art world that, in the past five to eight years, appeared for the first time in institutional presentations, art fairs, auctions, and art magazines. Emerging therefore indicates a performance or realization within the art market and is shaped by the network that produces sales, reviews, and institutional recognition of the produced artworks. Continue reading “Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market”