CFP: Session at CAA, Art, Agency, and the Making of Identities (Los Angeles, 21-24 Feb 18)

Call for Papers

Art, Agency, and the Making of Identities at a Global Level,
1600-2000
Session at CAA (Los Angeles, 21-24 Feb 18)

106th College Art Association Annual Conference Los Angeles, February 21 – 24, 2018
Deadline: Aug 14, 2017
http://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/

From: Biro Yaëlle, and Etienne, Noémi <yaelle.biro@metmuseum.org>

Co-Chairs: Yaëlle Biro, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Noémie Etienne, Bern University, Switzerland

Circulation and imitation of cultural products are key factors in shaping the material world – as well as imagined identities. Many objects or techniques that came to be seen as local, authentic and typical are in fact entangled in complex transnational narratives tied to a history of appropriation, imperialism, and the commercial phenomenon of supply and demand. In the 17th century, artists and craftspeople in Europe appropriated foreign techniques such as porcelain, textiles, or lacquers that eventually shaped local European identities. During the 19th century, Western consumers looked for genuine goods produced outside of industry, and the demand of Bourgeois tourism created a new market of authentic souvenirs and forgeries alike. Furthermore, the 19th and 20th centuries saw the (re)-emergence of local “Schools” of art and crafts as responses to political changes, anthropological research, and/or tourist demand. Continue reading “CFP: Session at CAA, Art, Agency, and the Making of Identities (Los Angeles, 21-24 Feb 18)”

CfP: 73rd annual SECAC Conference, Columbus, OH, 25-28 Oct 17

Call for papers for the Southeastern College Art Conference http://www.secacart.org/conference

The Columbus College of Art & Design (CCAD) in Columbus, Ohio, is hosting the 73rd annual SECAC Conference, October 25-28, 2017.

The call for paper proposals is available. The deadline is April 20 at midnight EDT.

The Collectors’ Impulse: Conspicuous Consumption or Philanthropy?

In his 1899 book, Theory of the Leisure Class, economist Thorstein Veblen coined the still-useful phrase, “conspicuous consumption,” meaning the pursuit of status via goods such as art works. More recently, Pierre Bourdieu argued that taste is inextricably linked to social standing. Most often one must possess wealth to amass noteworthy collections, but is collecting more complicated than status seeking or gaining cultural capital?  What if the consumer creates a museum with his or her art collection, such as Isabella Stewart Gardner, Henry and Arabella Huntington, and more recently, Eli Broad has done? Is this primarily creating institutions to solidify and enhance their cultural capital? Should others with great collections feel obligated to share them with the public or is it acceptable to keep them hidden until they are ready to sell? To what degree is a collection left to the public conspicuous consumption, philanthropy, or something else altogether? This panel seeks perspectives on collecting practices, past or present. Who is or was collecting and why? What aspects of collecting motivate one to share a collection with strangers (or not)? How should museum-goers react to private-turned-public collections?

Contact: Dr. Leanne Zalewski

Transatlantic Exchange between the US and Ireland

Transatlantic Exchange: Ireland and the United States in the 20th Century

This panel seeks papers that focus on transatlantic cultural exchange between Ireland and the United States during the twentieth century. Americans who traveled to Ireland, many compelled by familial connections, developed rich relationships with Irish artists that led to cultural exchange between the two countries, while tumultuous political circumstances in Ireland prompted Irish artists to leave their homeland. For example, Irish painter John Yeats and Irish American art collector John Quinn facilitated cultural exchange during the early decades of the twentieth century, particularly in that Yeats was the father of three of the most influential cultural figures in Ireland: writer W.B. Yeats; Ireland’s celebrated painter Jack Yeats; and textile designer Lily Yeats. After solidifying his connection with Quinn, Yeats went on to establish close ties to American artists John Sloan and Robert Henri.
This panel seeks to explore these and other examples of Irish/American transatlantic cultural exchange.

  • What impact did the American presence in Ireland have on Irish art?
  • Conversely, how have American artists been impacted by their experiences in Ireland?
  • What exhibitions document these exchanges?

These are but a few questions that we hope to answer on this panel.

Session Chairs: Cynthia Fowler, Emmanuel College; James Swensen, Brigham Young University

Contact: fowlecy@emmanuel.edu ; james_swensen@byu.edu

For more information:
https://secac.memberclicks.net/assets/documents/secac/conference/secac-2017-call-for-papers.pdf

Source: 2 Panels/Sessions at SECAC 2017 (Columbus, 25-28 Oct 17). In: H-ArtHist, Feb 20, 2017.

CfP: Special Issue of ‘Arts & The Market’ on Arts Marketing in Asia

Call For Papers
Special Issue of Arts & The Market on Arts Marketing in Asia

Deadline: 28th of April 2017

For this issue we invite submissions from a variety of perspectives focused on offering innovative insights into issues surrounding arts marketing in Asia.

Guest editors:
Dr. Yu-Chien Chang, National Chengchi University, Taiwan
Dr. Chloe Preece, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK

Arts and the Market is pleased to announce a Special issue focused on advances and development with regard to scholarship on Arts Marketing in Asia.

The past 10-15 years have seen interest in arts and cultural products from Asia steadily increase globally, from Bollywood films to Korean pop, Chinese contemporary art to Japanese manga and animation. In line with a more general interest in Asia’s emerging markets and their increased political power, there have recently been a number of publications examining the rapid growth of the creative and cultural industries in these areas both within academia (see Keane, 2011; Robertson, 2011; Punathambekar, 2013; Hong, 2014; Lee & Lim, 2014; Velthius, Komarova and Kharchenkova, 2015) as well as in the popular press (e.g. BBC, 2015). This work has seen a shift from an emphasis on production and manufacturing to nurturing creativity and the arts in order to capitalise on soft power to become a ‘cool’ nation (see for example the move from ‘made in China’ to ‘created in China’). To illustrate just one example, The Art Newspaper (2015) recently noted that art museums in Asia organised five of the top 10 most popular exhibitions in the world. These changes make it an interesting time to examine the art that is being produced in these nations and how it is being marketed and consumed, both at home and globally to understand the significance it is having on the cultural landscape.

Further details available here: Emerald Publishing Group CfP