ANN: Seminar: THE MARKET FOR MUNCH, Monday 11th 17:00-18:00, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Frances Carey – Independant scholar

Organised by Dr Klara Kemp- Welch – The Courtauld Institute of Art

Over a fifty-year period from 1894, Munch produced some 850 different printed compositions with as many as 30,000 impressions. His prints were exhibited on at least 268 occasions between 1895 and 1942 and a catalogue raisonné had been published by the end of 1907. Who was his audience and what capital, cultural as well as financial, did the work require?

The seminar anticipates the British Museum’s print exhibition (in association with the Munchmuseet in Oslo): Edvard Munch: Love and Angst from 11 April – 21 July 2019.

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CFP: AAH Conference, 5-7 April 2018

ASSOCIATION FOR ART HISTORY | 2018 ANNUAL CONFERENCE, LONDON, 5-7 APRIL 2018

2018 Annual Conference
Courtauld Institute of Art & King’s College London
5 – 7 April 2018, London

About
The 2018 Annual Conference for art history and visual culture will be co-hosted by the Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London. Academic sessions that papers will respond to the idea of ‘looking outwards’. This international 3 day event will look at art history in the broadest sense, and will incorporate a diverse range of speakers and perspectives.

Call for Papers – deadline 6 November 2017
The 2018 Annual Conference for art history and visual culture will be co-hosted by the Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London. This international 3 day event will look at art history in the broadest sense, and will incorporate a diverse range of academic sessions, speakers and perspectives.

 

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CONF: Annual Third Year Postgraduate Symposium (London, 8-9 Jun 17)

London, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Somerset House, Strand, June 8 – 09, 2017
Registration deadline: Jun 7, 2017

The Courtauld’s New Research Symposium 2017 is a platform for third-year PhD candidates to present and exchange their research to their peers, the wider scholarly community and the public. Ranging from medieval England to contemporary Bosnia-Herzegovina via Renaissance Florence the conference will bring questions concerning materiality, identity and institutions to bear on art and politics. Whether performing a close analysis of a late-fifteenth-century altarpiece frame or a Marxist reading of photographic technologies after the 2008 financial crisis, what are the pressing methodological questions for the discipline? This conference provides a place to consider how the cohort has been collectively thinking through critical challenges and new directions for the History of Art.

Including a keynote by Lynda Nead (Pevsner Professor of History of Art, Birkbeck, University of London)

Free, all welcome, but booking required:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/annual-third-year-postgraduate-symposium-tickets-34656949870

Attendees are welcome to come to a single session if they wish.

PROGRAM for Part of Friday, June 9

11:30–12:25 Session 6: Modernisms, Materials, Markets

Giovanni Casini: ‘A Dealer’s “Dictatorship”? Giorgio de Chirico, Léonce Rosenberg and the Parisian Art Market in the late 1920s’

Rachel Mustalish: ‘Arthur Dove: Modernism through Materials’

12:30–13:25 Session 7: Collections and Canons

Naomi Speakman: The Virtuoso Appetite: The Medieval Antiquities of Ralph Bernal’

Imogen Tedbury: ‘After the “game of grab”: collecting, displaying and selling Sienese painting after the “Burlington Magazine wars” of 1903’

CFP: Writing Impressionism Into and Out of Art History (London, 3-4 Nov 17)

 

A man and woman walking under an umbrella in a Paris road, other walkers-by; costumes of ca. 1877.
Gustave Caillebotte – Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877; Art Institute of Chicago

London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, November 3 – 04, 2017
Deadline: Feb 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

Impressionism continues to be celebrated in blockbuster exhibitions worldwide: in the last few years alone, Impressionism, Fashion, Modernity (Art Institute of Chicago, Musée d’Orsay, and Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2013); Gustave Caillebotte: The Painter’s Eye (Kimbell Art Museum and National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 2015-2016); and Inventing Impressionism: Paul Durand-Ruel and the Modern Art Market (Musée du Luxembourg, National Gallery, London, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015). Since 1878 when Théodore Duret published his Histoire des peintres impressionnistes, Impressionism has occupied a central place in the canon of art history. That place now seems to be called into question, however. New transnational approaches to nineteenth-century art history have troubled the perpetuation of Francocentric histories. As the field’s attention has increasingly turned to places outside France—Britain, the United States, Australia, and beyond—Impressionism has been pushed to the margins. Though Impressionism has long benefited from powerful and compelling narratives via the social history of art, these readings have been worked through so extensively that it warrants asking whether this area of art history may be exhausted for the moment.

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