Lecture: The Art Market in the 20th and 21st Centuries (Lisbon, 19-20 Oct, 17)

The Art Market in the 20th and 21st Centuries: Mapping a still unwritten history

Lecture by TIAMSA Co-Chair Johannes Nathan at the Palácio do Correio Velho, Lisbon, Friday, 20 October, 6pm

Beginning with a brief overview of the speaker’s family history, this lecture will outline the development of the art market in the 20th century and the changing role of different business models. In view of the recent attention to provenance research, it will then turn to the growing importance of the study of art market history. The lecture will conclude by pointing to the challenges that still face students of this subject – and how they might be overcome.

The lecture will be preceded by a workshop on „The Art Market Dictionary – The Challenge of Raw Data“ for the students of Mercados da Arte Contemporânea no Mundo Global at the Instituto de História da Arte, Universidade Nova de Lisboa on 19 October 2017, 6pm to 9pm

These are the kick-off events of the “Art Market and Collecting in the European Southern Countries and Brazil”, a new TIAMSA sub-committee, whose first meeting will take place on 19 October in Lisbon.

CFP: Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide – digital humanities

NCAW Terra-funded digital humanities publishing initiative

Deadline: Jan 15, 2018

The peer-reviewed open-access journal Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (NCAW) is pleased to announce a new digital humanities publishing initiative supported by a grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. The editors of NCAW are now accepting proposals for articles addressing art and visual culture of the Americas in the long nineteenth century, from the American Revolution to World War I. NCAW seeks proposals that take full advantage of the potential of digital publishing by using digital technologies in the article’s research or publication phase, or both. Strong proposals will demonstrate how the production of digital tool(s) and/or components will lead to a scholarly argument’s key insights (either the tool/component enhanced the depth of insight or made it possible) and/or will illustrate aspects of that argument in dynamic/interactive ways.

NCAW welcomes proposals that creatively or innovatively juxtapose digital tools and/or components with art historical analysis. NCAW encourages authors to use open source software when possible. While by no means limited to the following, proposals might explore:

  • High resolution imaging or dynamic image presentation (e.g., panoramas, zoom images, visual essays, x-ray or infrared reflectography, moving images, 3D images of art objects, annotated musical scores, annotated digital facsimiles)
  • “Big data” mining and analysis (e.g., social network analysis or text mining using analytics programs like Gephi, Network Workbench)
  • Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (e.g., depictions of sites, locations of objects, paths of travel, using online mapping tools like MapBox, Timemapper, Neatline)

NCAW is a pioneer in publishing art historical digital humanities projects. For examples of already-completed digital humanities projects published in NCAW, see <http://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/digital-humanities-and-art-history>.

To propose a digital humanities project, please submit:

A. Abstract (500 words maximum) as a Microsoft Word document detailing the scholarly content of the article, including how information gleaned from the proposed digital tool will impact the article’s interpretive claims

B. Abstract (500 words maximum) as a Microsoft Word document outlining the appearance/format of the digital tool(s) and explaining how the author plans to present the article and tool within the NCAW framework (technologies used, layout, etc.). Also provide link(s) from existing digital project(s) that resemble your proposed project functionally, aesthetically, or in the technologies used, followed by several sentences describing which elements of that project will differ from/emulate your proposed digital tool

C. Budget (1 page maximum)

D. CV

Authors are not expected to have extensive technical expertise themselves, but should be generally knowledgeable about the technical possibilities related to their project and should be able to articulate how digital research methods and NCAW’s digital publication format connect with their research questions. Upon acceptance of a proposal authors will identify, in discussion with NCAW editors, the digital tools/software to be used and, if necessary, will be expected to identify technical collaborators. NCAW editors will assist with the development of a timeline and with guidelines for workflow, but authors will be responsible for managing their projects.

If interested contributors have an idea for a digital humanities project but would like to discuss it with the editors first, we would be happy to talk with you about your ideas in advance of the deadline.

Please send proposals to Managing Editor Petra Chu <petra.chu[at]shu.edu,> Executive Editor Isabel Taube <taubeisa[at]gmail.com> and Digital Humanities Editor Elizabeth Buhe <ebuhe[at]nyu.edu>. Deadline: Monday, January 15, 2018.

Reference: CFP: Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide – digital humanities. In: ArtHist.net, Sep 22, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16143>.