CFP: Encounters, Entanglements, and Exchanges (New Haven, 6 Apr 19)

Yale University, April 06, 2019
Deadline: Feb 1, 2019

The Fifteenth Annual Yale University American Art Graduate Symposium
Encounters, Entanglements, and Exchanges

Points of encounter can occur across time and space. In the seventeenth century, Puebla blue-and-white pottery responded to East Asian porcelain while ceramic manufacturers in China adapted designs that catered to pan-American tastes. More recently, Carrie Mae Weems’s “The Hampton Project” reexamined a nineteenth-century vocational school that served as a cultural crossroads for formerly enslaved African Americans, American Indians, and white Americans to raise pressing questions of race, imperialism, and nationalism. These points of convergence between individuals, groups, places, and objects often instigate shifts in creative production with lasting and global resonances. The interaction of disparate cultures offers a rich nexus for artistic creation. Yet such encounters are also inseparable from the shifting dynamics of power that operate along gendered, racial, economic, and political lines. What can exchanges and entanglements reveal about the nature of encounter? How do encounters shape exchanges? In what ways do exchanges propagate new encounters?

The Fifteenth Annual Yale University American Art Graduate Symposium invites papers that interrogate the dialectical relationship between encounter and exchange and explore the legacies of cultural intersection. We invite submissions that address art across North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean, that engage a range of critical perspectives, and that speak to a variety of time periods and artistic practices.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

– Activism, coalition building, and the arts
– Micro-histories that address a specific instance of encounter
– Collaborations that problematize narratives of “influence” across social, cultural, or political hierarchies
– Impact of religious proselytization and conversion in the arts
– Gift exchange, diplomacy, and trade
– Appropriation, fetishism, and mimicry
– Contact zones, intersectionality, and peripheries
– Imbalanced power dynamics within systems of colonialism, racism, homophobia, or sexism
– Immigration, migrants, and refugees
– Authorship and ownership
– Tourism and travel narratives
– Global encounters with the notion of “Americanness”
– Networks created via technology, globalization, and media

Interested participants are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 350 words along with a CV to americanist.symposium@gmail.com by February 1, 2019. Accepted participants will be notified in mid-February. Accommodations will be provided for all participants in New Haven, Connecticut.

CONF: 15th Annual Graduate Symposium in Nineteenth-Century Art

Dahesh Museum of Art, New York City, March 18, 2018

FIFTEENTH ANNUAL GRADUATE STUDENT SYMPOSIUM
IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART

Co-sponsored by the Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art (AHNCA) and
the Dahesh Museum of Art
Location: Dahesh Museum of Art, 145 Sixth Avenue, New York City

Special thanks to the Dahesh Museum of Art for the Dahesh Museum Art Prize for the Best Paper,
a gift from the Mervat Zahid Cultural Foundation

10 AM: Welcome
Peter Trippi, President of Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art

10:15 AM
Lucie Grandjean, Université Paris Nanterre, “John Vanderlyn and the Circulation of Panoramic Images in Nineteenth-Century America: Promoting and Diffusing ‘a love and taste for the arts’”
Through a study of John Vanderlyn’s panoramic venture, this presentation will show how he developed both a national and international artistic network on the American continent. Lucie Grandjean questions the status of the artist in a young democracy and re-evaluates notions of success and its impact on the artist’s career.

3:00 PM:
Galina Olmsted, University of Delaware, “’Je compte absolument sur vous’: Gustave Caillebotte and the 1877 Exhibition”
By reframing the third Impressionist exhibition as one designed by Caillebotte as a vehicle for exhibiting the most ambitious pictures of his career, this paper presents a case study for understanding how his activities as an exhibition organizer, lender, and participant shaped and were shaped by his innovative painting practice.