CFP: Handbook of Heritage Law and Discourse

Call for papers for an edited Volume

Handbook of Heritage Law and Discourse. A Triadic Dimension: Protection, Regulation and Identity

Editors: Le Cheng and Anne Wagner. Publisher: Springer.
Deadline: Feb 28, 2019

The past four decades has witnessed the remarkable extension of enthusiasm in cultural heritage or property from the perspective of international laws, or international legal framework as the multilevel legal instruments for safeguarding, protection and maintenance of cultural heritage, property, or rights. In our project, the identification of “Heritage” employs specific discourses, codes, transcending values, and images that conceal assumption about members of a people comprising a people within a nation. Heritage narrates constructions of belongings that become tethered to negotiations for power and resistance over time and throughout a people’s history leading to powerful discursive narratives. While such likeness may be preserved, conserved or even perpetuated, the idea of “Heritage” may be socially, politically, culturally, and historically contested to reveal competing pasts, presents, and futures, esp. with innovation in arts leading to new social norms and identities. Continue reading “CFP: Handbook of Heritage Law and Discourse”

Call for Sessions: Art and its directions, AAANZ (Perth)

The Conference Committee would like to invite proposals for panel sessions for the AAANZ 2017 Conference in Perth.

The deadline for session proposals is COB Monday 22 May 2017

Please see the submission instructions below. All enquiries to conf@aaanz.info.

This year’s conference theme Art and its Directions is broadly conceived against the backdrop of debates relating to national sovereignty and globalisation. Rather than purely a focus on politically based art in this context, we turn to the question of directions in art, where directions refer both to geography and chronology. The aim is to investigate artistic production and exchange in relation to the geographical, conceptual and imaginative relationships between north, south, east and west, so as to encompass discussion of transnational and global art histories; and the binaries of centre and periphery, modern and traditional. The theme takes account of the conference location in Western Australia – ranging from perceptions of the west to its distinct collections, and history.

There is also focus upon how art objects and art practices exist in different spatial and temporal contexts. This may include discussion of the mobility of objects and the materials of art, and of curatorial practices relating to the display of works of art.

Convenors of panel sessions might consider subject areas such as:

  • The theorising of geographies in relation to art
  • Art and the changing history of place
  • Landscapes, travel and the sensory dimension of place
  • Heritage, nostalgia and anachronism in art
  • Contemporary curatorial practice and its global aspects
  • Indigenous art and cultural objects in their original settings and in the museum
  • The legacy of colonialism in historical and contemporary art practice
  • Emigré and refugee artists, and cross-cultural exchange
  • Representations of the cosmos, and the mapping of sea and land in Aboriginal art
  • Aboriginal rock art and cross-cultural encounters
  • Art and cartography, navigation, travel and trade
  • The translocation of art through commercial forces and war
  • The mobility of images in the digital age, including the role of photography
  • The space of the studio and its relation to the outer world

Continue reading “Call for Sessions: Art and its directions, AAANZ (Perth)”

CFP: Art Crime and Stolen Heritage, Session at EAA (Maastricht, 30 Aug-3 Sep 17)

Deadline: Mar 15, 2017

Art Crime and Stolen Heritage: Towards an Archaeological Consensus

Organizers: James Symonds, Nour A. Munawar, Lindsay Morehouse, Christine Acosta Weirich, Marina Lostal, Jens Notroff

The looting of archaeological sites is by no means a recent phenomenon and has been taking place in war zones for centuries. The incidence of illicit trade has, however, been significantly influenced in recent years by the growth of international art markets that are willing to accept/sell unprovenanced items. Examples of the privatisation of public monuments have added to the loss of cultural heritage by placing items in private hands. Additionally, social media platforms/cost sharing applications have provided readily accessible markets for art objects and archaeological artefacts.

Continue reading “CFP: Art Crime and Stolen Heritage, Session at EAA (Maastricht, 30 Aug-3 Sep 17)”