PUB: “From Florence to London to New York: J.P. Morgan’s Bronze Doors,” Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, vol. 16, no. 3, Autum by Lynn Catterson

This article, based on recently discovered material in several archives, tells the story of the bronze doors of the Morgan Library.[1] It narrates the travel of the allegedly Renaissance bronze doors from their acquisition in Florence in 1901, to their brief sojourn in London before arriving in New York to adorn the principal façade of McKim, Mead & White’s building. This case study also addresses the attribution of the work to Thomas Waldo Story (1855–1915) and analyzes his position within the complex social microcosm of the art market in which the acquisition of J. Pierpont Morgan’s doors took place.

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Made in the USA: Collecting American Art during the Long Nineteenth Century, New York, March 3-4, 17

10th Anniversary Events at The Frick Collection
Center for the History of Collecting
Symposium

Made in the USA: Collecting American Art during the Long Nineteenth Century

Friday, March 3, and Saturday, March 4
Presented by the Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library

This two-day symposium focuses on collections of American art formed during the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth century and concludes with a conversation with Alice Walton, the greatest living collector of American art and the founder of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Presentations not only examine the tastes and activities of private collectors and dealers, but also explore specific areas of collecting, such as Connecticut collectors, patrons and collectors of American Pre-Raphaelite art, collections of private clubs, and the trade in faked Colonial portraits.

Tickets for both days are $50 ($35 for members); single-day tickets are $30 ($25 for members).

Programme (pdf)