CONF: Objects of Exchange: Art and Economic Encounters (Paris, 7-8 Sep 17)

International Symposium
Institut National d’Histoire de l’art (INHA)
Paris, 07. – 08.09.2017

Org. Alexander Alberro (Columbia University), Sophie Cras (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Exchange is classically described by economists as a phenomenon of equalization of values within a given system. When heterogeneous orders of economic rationalities meet, material objects and practices come to embody the paradoxes of dissonant exchange. This symposium aims to explore how artifacts and artistic practices have materialized ruptures within, and encounters between, economic systems in the modern and contemporary period.

PROGRAM

7 September 2017

2.oo pm / Introduction, Alexander Alberro (Columbia University) & Sophie Cras (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) Continue reading “CONF: Objects of Exchange: Art and Economic Encounters (Paris, 7-8 Sep 17)”

Review: Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp

Christine Göttler, Bart Ramakers, and Joanna Woodall, eds.
Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp 
Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, 64. Leiden: Brill, 2014. 400 pp.;
180 color ills. Cloth
$157.00(9789004272156)

Nadia Baadj
Jan van Kessel I (1626–1679): Crafting a Natural History of Art in Early Modern Antwerp
(Studies in Baroque Art) (Dutch Edition).
Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 208 pp.;
52 color ills.; 50 b/w ills. Cloth
$150.00(9781909400238)

Review by Marisa Anne Bass
CrossRef DOI: 10.3202/caa.reviews.2017.90

The history of art in early modern Europe would be unthinkable without Antwerp. And yet until quite recently, Antwerp was a place that nobody talked much about. Scholarship on the southern Netherlandish city (now part of Belgium) long remained the province of local historians, the indefatigable Floris Prims notable among them. And while first Pieter Paul Rubens and then Pieter Bruegel the Elder met with increasing art-historical interest following Belgium’s assertion of independence in 1830, a dogged nationalistic approach to their oeuvres meant that the city in which they lived and worked did not generate much attention in its own right. It was the artist as Flemish genius, and not the city as stimulus, that mattered.