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PROGRAMME NOW ONLINE – TIAMSA CONF: Art for the People?

ART FOR THE PEOPLE?

QUESTIONING THE DEMOCRATIZATION OF THE ART MARKET

2018 Conference of TIAMSA
The International Art Market Studies Association
artmarketstudies.org

 Vienna, Thursday 27 Sept – Saturday 29 Sept 2018

The Belvedere in Vienna – one of our hosting institutions

HOSTING INSTITUTIONS
Belvedere Research Center, Vienna (belvedere.at)
Dorotheum (dorotheum.com)
Vienna University, Department of Art History (kunstgeschichte.univie.ac.at)
Vienna Contemporary, Austria’s International Art Fair (viennacontemporary.at)

 

PROGRAMME

ART FOR THE PEOPLE_Conference Program_TIAMSA 2018

REGISTRATION
Please note that you have to register for this conference: a link for the general registration is at the bottom of this page, links for special events (to be booked separately) are embedded in the programme. TIAMSA members go free!

THURSDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2018

SPECIAL TOURS

15:00-17:00 – Tour of viennacontemporary
Austria’s International Art Fair (conference participants receive a complimentary pass)
Meeting Point: viennacontemporary, Marx Halle, Karl-Farkas-Gasse 19, 1030 Vienna
Limited space available, REGISTRATION: https://tiamsa_conf_viennacontemp.eventbrite.com

15:00-17:00 – Dealer Archives and Provenance Research at the Belvedere
An Insiders’ Tour with Christian Huemer and Monika Mayer (Belvedere Research Center)
Meeting Point: Belvedere Research Center, Rennweg 4, 1030 Vienna
Limited space available, REGISTRATION: https://tiamsa_conf_belvederetour.eventbrite.com

 

ROUND TABLE

17:30-19:00 – The Art Market and the Internet
Venue: viennacontemporary, Marx Halle, Karl-Farkas-Gasse 19, 1030 Vienna [access included in your conference ticket]

On the Podium:
Kristina Kulakova (viennacontemporary)
Sophie Neuendorf (artnet Worldwide Corp.)
Anna Maja Spiess (Artsy)
Olav Velthuis (University of Amsterdam)
Moderator: Johannes Nathan (TIAMSA / TU Berlin)

 

CONFERENCE DINNER (open to all, registration required)
19:15 at the nearby ‘Paul and the Monkeys’ which will be open just for us: Maria-Jacobi-Gasse 1, 1030 Wien
15€ p.p. for food, collected on the night; drinks to be paid separately. Registration required (closes Sept 15th).
Limited space available, REGISTRATION: https://tiamsa_conf_dinner.eventbrite.com
PLEASE NOTE THAT WE WILL CHARGE A 15€ FEE FOR CANCELLATIONS THAT REACH US AFTER REGISTRATION CLOSURE
 

FRIDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2018
Belvedere 21, Blickle Kino, Arsenalstraße 1, 1030 Wien

09:00 – Doors Open, Registration, Coffee
09.30 – WELCOME: Johannes Nathan (TIAMSA / TU Berlin) / Stella Rollig (General Director, Belvedere)

SECTION 1 – Transformations
Chair: Christian Huemer (Belvedere Research Center)

09:40 – Filip Vermeylen (Erasmus University Rotterdam): A Mass Market for Art? Collecting Paintings in the Low Countries during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

10:05 – Lukas Fuchsgruber (Technische Universität Berlin): The Auction House as an Urban Space in 19th Century Paris

10:30 – Long Coffee Break (30 mins.)

11:00 – Clarissa Ricci (Università Iuav Venezia): The Production of Art in the Age of Political Practice. Venice Biennale 1970

11:25 – Ronit Milano (Ben Gurion University of the Negev): Moralizing the Art Market. A Socio-Economic Perspective on Online-Auctions

11:50 – Concluding Discussion

12:05 – Lunch Break; you will also have the opportunity to visit the exhibitions at Belvedere21

SECTION 2 – Circulation of Information and Expertise
Chair: Sebastian Schütze (University of Vienna)

14:00 – Leanne Zalewski (Central Connecticut State University): The “Dealer-Expert” in Late Nineteenth-Century New York

14:25 – Michaela Jenisova (Charles University Prague): Wilhelm von Bode and Rudolf Kann. The Importance of the Advisor-Collector Relationship in the Late 19th-Century Art Market

14:50 – Short Coffee Break (15 mins.)

15:05 – Anne-Sophie Radermecker (Université libre de Bruxelles): Selling ‚Knowledge‘? The Market Reception of New Connoisseurship

15:30 – Jack Roberts (Independent, UK): Is the Age of the Dealer Drawing to a Close or Is It More Important than Ever?

15:55 – Concluding Discussion

16:10 – Long Coffee Break (30 mins.)

SECTION 3 – Elites and the People
Chair: Veronika Korbei (TIAMSA)

16:40 – Santiago González Villajos (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid): Street Art and Market Practices in the Mural Art Series: From a People’s Art to Intermurals and Beyond

17:05 – Dorothee Wimmer (Technische Universität Berlin): Has the Art Market’s Democratization Caused a Boom in Private Museums?

17:30 – Stoyan Sgourev (ESSEC Paris): The Bifurcation of the Art Market. Precedents and Consequences

17:55 – Concluding Discussion

18:10 – Evening Break (35 mins.)

KEYNOTE LECTURE
18:45 – Payal Arora (Erasmus University Rotterdam): Automating Culture. How Digital Platforms are Shaping the Art World

followed by

DRINKS RECEPTION

**********************

SATURDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2018


Palais Dorotheum, Auktionssaal (2nd floor); use entrance on Dorotheergasse 17, 1010 Vienna 

09:00 – Doors open, Coffee

09:30 – WELCOME: Felicitas Thurn (Dorotheum) / Sebastian Schütze (University of Vienna)

SECTION 4 – Centers and So-Called Peripheries
Chair: Felicitas Thurn (Dorotheum)

09:40 – Luís Urbano Afonso (Universidade de Lisboa): Collecting, Displaying and Using African Ivories in 16th Century Western Europe

10:05 – Stephanie Dieckvoss (Kingston University London): The Musée d’Art Contemporain Africain Al Maaden in Marrakech: How to Democratize the art World as a Private Collector in Emerging Markets

10:30 – Long Coffee Break (30 mins.)

11:00 – Malvika Maheswari (Ashoka University): ‚Everybody Loves a Good Attack?‘ Violence by the ‚People‘ as a Variable in Art Markets and Lessons from India Today

11:25 – Olav Velthuis (University of Amsterdam): Drawing National Boundaries. How Contemporary Artists from Emerging Regions Get Integrated into Global Art Markets

11:50 – Concluding Discussion

12:05 – Lunch Break

13:00 – Session for TIAMSA Groups / Sub-Committees
Chairs: Filip Vermeylen (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Veronika Korbei (TIAMSA), Johannes Nathan (TIAMSA)

SECTION 5: Launching TIAMSA Legal
Chairs: Philipp Nuernberger (Attorney at Law, NY / London) and Alicja Jagielska-Burduk (University of Opole)

13:45 – Philipp Nuernberger and Alicja Jagielska-Burduk: Welcome and Introduction to TIAMSA Legal, ‘Art Market – Legal challenges and pitfalls’

14:00 – Justine Ferland (Art-Law Centre, Université de Genève): Art market due diligence and the Responsible Art Market (RAM) Initiative

14:10 – Thomas Steinruck (Fine Art Insurance, Zurich): Self-Regulatory Frameworks: The Art Basel Art Market Principles and Best Practices

14:20 – Dr. Saskia Hufnagel: Preventing, investigating and prosecuting money-laundering in the art market

14:30 – Fernando Loureiro Bastos (Universidade de Lisboa) and Prof. Marcílio Franca (Federal University of Paraíba): Legal implications of street art as a “democratized” / “open” form of art

14:40 – Discussion

15:10 – Short Coffee Break (20 mins.)

15:30 – ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of TIAMSA, The International Art Market Studies Association

16:15  – TIAMSA LOOKING AHEAD: An open discussion with our members on the future of our association (all welcome)

17:00 – Conference ends

CONFERENCE FEE AND REGISTRATION
The conference fee includes lunches and drinks on Friday and Saturday, a pass to viennacontemporary and free entry to the Belvedere.

TIAMSA members go FREE; to become a TIAMSA member (GBP 20 / 10 p.a.), register at https://www.artmarketstudies.org/join/
Non-members: €30 full / €15 concessions

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION (required, closes Sept 25th)
https://art4thepeople_tiamsa_conf_2018.eventbrite.com

 

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Christian Huemer (Belvedere Research Center)
Veronika Korbei (TIAMSA)
Johannes Nathan (TIAMSA / TU Berlin)
Sebastian Schütze (University of Vienna)
Felicitas Thurn (Dorotheum)
Olav Velthuis (University of Amsterdam)
Filip Vermeylen (Erasmus University, Rotterdam) 

THIS CONFERENCE IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY
Belvedere, Vienna (belvedere.at)
Dorotheum, Vienna (dorotheum.com)
Vienna Contemporary, Austria’s International Art Fair (viennacontemporary.at)
Swiss Art Trading Association (khvs.ch)

CFP: Seminars in the History of Collecting 2019

Call for Papers

The seminar series was established as part of the Wallace Collection’s commitment to the research and study of the history of collections and collecting, especially in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in Paris and London.  In 2019, as in previous years, we plan to organise a series of 10 seminars.

We are keen to encourage contributions covering all aspects of the history of collecting, including:

  • Formation and dispersal of collections
  • Dealers, auctioneers and the art market
  • Collectors
  • Museums
  • Inventory work
  • Research resources

The seminars, which are normally held on the last Monday of every month during the calendar year, excluding August and December, act as a forum for the presentation and discussion of new research into the history of collecting. Seminars are open to curators, academics, historians, archivists and all those with an interest in the subject. Papers are generally 45-60 minutes long and all the seminars take place at the Wallace Collection between 5.30 and 7pm.

If interested, please send a short text (500-750 words), including a brief CV, indicating any months when you would not be available to speak, by Friday 7 September 2018.

For more information and to submit a proposal, please contact:

collection@wallacecollection.org

New Book: The Shift, by Marta Gnyp

New Book: The Shift: Art and the Rise of Power of Contemporary Collectors by Marta Gnyp, Art and Theory Publishing, Stockholm. 2018.

This discussion of the art market and the role of the collector today provides an excellent overview of the different aspects of the contemporary art market. Based on Gnyp’s PhD thesis and combined with her professional experience as a consultant in Berlin, this book  connects the collector with his world: the art fairs, auctions, art advisors and dealers. It also considers the sometimes vexed and hotly debated topic of the growing importance of financial investment in the art market. In this as in other areas, although information is taken directly from the players, through interviews and case studies, it is difficult to go below the surface. It is difficult to break certain myths, for example that the collector buys for love and with his/her heart, that he/she doesn’t sell except for very good reasons. Gnyp tries and some of her interviews honestly assess the market- one collector describes the art fair as not selling art but selling a commodity or an artist describes the dilemma when his collectors sell his works, in spite of promises to keep them forever, because they have become too valuable. The study of the Columbian artist, Oscar Murillo and his rapid rise to international stardom is interesting, particularly when Gnyp  discusses the comments by collectors on his work.  The book is an excellent coverage of the main aspects of the contemporary art market; the introduction is a model summary of what someone entering the study of the art market should consider. As the book proceeds, it gives a detached  and measured account of the art market today and the increasingly important role the collector is playing in determining the success of an artist.

Review by Adriana Turpin, IESA and Society for the History of Collecting

Exh: German Sales 1901 – 1929 (Berlin, 5 Sept, 2018)

Kulturforum, Kunstbibliothek
Matthäikirchplatz 6, 10785 Berlin
Öffnungszeiten:
Mo 14 – 20 Uhr, Di – Fr 9 – 20 Uhr, Sa + So 11 – 18 Uhr

German Sales 1901 – 1929
5. Juli – 5. September 2018

Eine Sonderpräsentation der Kunstbibliothek – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin im Rahmen des Forschungsprojekts „Kunst – Auktionen – Provenienzen. Der deutsche Kunsthandel im Spiegel der Auktionskataloge der Jahre 1901 bis 1929“ in Kooperation mit der Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg und dem Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

Kunstversteigerungen etablierten sich in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz ab der Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts. Hochwertige Kunstwerke trafen auf internationale Käufer und erzielten Preise, die mit Pariser, Londoner und Amsterdamer Versteigerungsresultaten konkurrieren konnten. In der Sonderpräsentation „German Sales 1901 – 1929“ werden im Foyer der Kunstbibliothek erste Ergebnisse des von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) geförderten Forschungs- und Digitalisierungsprojekts „Kunst – Auktionen – Provenienzen. Der deutsche Kunsthandel im Spiegel der Auktionskataloge der Jahre 1901 bis 1929“ vorgestellt.

Continue reading “Exh: German Sales 1901 – 1929 (Berlin, 5 Sept, 2018)”

Vom Umgang mit Künstler*innen-Nachlässen – Erfahrungsberichte zum künstlerischen Nachlass von Jakob Strasser (1896–1978) (Rheinfelden, Sept 14, 2018)

Das Schweizerische Institut für Kunstwissenschaft (SIK-ISEA) hat 2017 einen Ratgeber zum Umgang mit Künstlernachlässen herausgegeben. Darin werden Strategien der Bewertung und Vermittlung, die Werkdokumentation und -konservierung, der Umgang mit dokumentarischen Nachlässen und rechtliche Normen erklärt und illustriert.

Nun rücken Erfahrungen im Umgang mit verschiedenen künstlerischen Nachlässen in den Blickpunkt. An wechselnden Standorten in allen Sprachregionen der Schweiz wird solches Wissen im Rahmen von Gesprächsabenden mit einem breiten Publikum geteilt. Ob Erben, zukünftige Erblasser, Nachlassverwalter oder Interessierte: Vor welchen Herausforderungen und Auflagen stehen sie, wie organisieren sie sich? Was bewährt sich und was nicht? Continue reading “Vom Umgang mit Künstler*innen-Nachlässen – Erfahrungsberichte zum künstlerischen Nachlass von Jakob Strasser (1896–1978) (Rheinfelden, Sept 14, 2018)”

TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.

TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.
PUBLISHED ON 7th August 2018 by Julie Codell
CAA session for The International Art Market Studies, deadline extended to Aug 15: The Studio as Market
Chair: Julie F. Codell
Email: julie.codell@asu.edu

Artists’ studios have been the site of workshops, collaboration, promotion, mystery, and myth, at times considered a hallowed space, at other times a disreputable one. They have also been the places of social, political, and economic transactions that shape aesthetic values. In the studio artists self-fashioned their social status and promoted their works. They invited critics, dealers, and patrons into their studios turning studios into sites that combined a presumed mysterious creative energy with economic exchange while purposely misapprehending economic considerations. This session will explore how artists from the eighteenth century on under dwindling church and aristocratic patronage strategically entered the “free” market by using their studios to promote and sell works in conjunction with creating marketable public identities to engage buyers and generate symbolic capital for their name and their work. Topics can include the nature and function of the studio in the free market, artists’ strategies to both engage in economic activities and misrecognize economics in the studio, the studio as a site of conflicts over agency in overlapping aesthetic and economic transactions or as an exhibitionary site to display the creative process itself, the studio’s combined production and reception functions, among other topics.

By August 15 send submission materials: CAA form (at http://www.collegeart.org/…/programs/conference/CFP-form.pdf), 1-2 pg CV and 250-word proposal– to Julie Codell, Arizona State University, at julie.codell@asu.edu

TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.

CAA session for The International Art Market Studies, deadline extended to Aug 15: The Studio as Market
Chair: Julie F. Codell
Email: julie.codell@asu.edu

Artists’ studios have been the site of workshops, collaboration, promotion, mystery, and myth, at times considered a hallowed space, at other times a disreputable one. They have also been the places of social, political, and economic transactions that shape aesthetic values. In the studio artists self-fashioned their social status and promoted their works. They invited critics, dealers, and patrons into their studios turning studios into sites that combined a presumed mysterious creative energy with economic exchange while purposely misapprehending economic considerations. This session will explore how artists from the eighteenth century on under dwindling church and aristocratic patronage strategically entered the “free” market by using their studios to promote and sell works in conjunction with creating marketable public identities to engage buyers and generate symbolic capital for their name and their work. Topics can include the nature and function of the studio in the free market, artists’ strategies to both engage in economic activities and misrecognize economics in the studio, the studio as a site of conflicts over agency in overlapping aesthetic and economic transactions or as an exhibitionary site to display the creative process itself, the studio’s combined production and reception functions, among other topics.

By August 15 send submission materials: CAA form (at http://www.collegeart.org/…/programs/conference/CFP-form.pdf), 1-2 pg CV and 250-word proposal– to Julie Codell, Arizona State University, at julie.codell@asu.edu