Book Out Now: Lynn Catterson ed., Dealing Art on Both Sides of the Atlantic, Brill

A Discount Code for this second book in the HCAM series is available to all TIAMSA members.
Please log in and find the Discount Code for Brill post in the Members’ Only Section.

Flyer Dealing Art (.pdf)

 

Read this: “The Museum of Modern Art’s Artist Network Diagram and the Culture of Capitalism”

“Inventing Abstraction, Reinventing Our Selves: The Museum of Modern Art’s Artist Network Diagram and the Culture of Capitalism,”
by Nicole E. Reiner and Jonathan Patkowski

If the studio and the workshop are the places where artworks and new ways of thinking and seeing most often take shape, exhibitions are the sites where such creations meet the public and, in the course of their reception, make, and re-make, art history.

Inventing Abstraction at the Museum of Modern Art (December 23, 2012-April 15, 2013), which critics praised as offering a fresh, inclusive and cross-disciplinary perspective on the origins of artistic abstraction, is one such exhibition summoning the full potential of this form of object-based historiography.1 Alongside modernist titans like Picasso and Mondrian, the exhibition spotlighted comparatively unfamiliar figures and many women artists. Curator Leah Dickerman further stressed the transmedial reach of abstraction beyond the traditional domains of painting and sculpture by foregrounding abstract photography, music, dance and poetry, paralleling MoMA’s own disciplinary re-orientation beyond painting and sculpture over the preceding decade……..

Rutgers Art Review (11pp, a .pdf version is available)

Read this: ARTISTS’ LEGACIES UNPACKED in ART JOURNAL

“What to do with all the stuff?” This is one of many questions posed—and provisionally answered—in the most recent issue of Art Journal, in an extensive multiauthor forum that delves into the complex matter of artists’ estates. “The Politics of Legacy,” guest-edited for the journal by Rachel Middleman and Anne Monahan, comprises contributions by no fewer than twenty-one artists and scholars. The texts include interviews (with, for example, Flavin and Rainer Judd, Mira Friedlaender, and Jane Kallir of Grandma Moses Properties, Inc.) and position papers (by Caroline A. Jones, Michael Corris, and Nancy J. Troy, among others). Central to the forum are three commissioned artists’ projects by Danh Vo (on the estate of Martin Wong), Mimi Gross (the estate of her father Chaim Gross, as well as her own legacy as an artist), and Jill Magid (the contested estate of the Mexican architect Luis Barragán).

Artists Legacies Unpacked – CAA News

 

Review: Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp

Christine Göttler, Bart Ramakers, and Joanna Woodall, eds.
Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp 
Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, 64. Leiden: Brill, 2014. 400 pp.;
180 color ills. Cloth
$157.00(9789004272156)

Nadia Baadj
Jan van Kessel I (1626–1679): Crafting a Natural History of Art in Early Modern Antwerp
(Studies in Baroque Art) (Dutch Edition).
Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 208 pp.;
52 color ills.; 50 b/w ills. Cloth
$150.00(9781909400238)

Review by Marisa Anne Bass
CrossRef DOI: 10.3202/caa.reviews.2017.90

The history of art in early modern Europe would be unthinkable without Antwerp. And yet until quite recently, Antwerp was a place that nobody talked much about. Scholarship on the southern Netherlandish city (now part of Belgium) long remained the province of local historians, the indefatigable Floris Prims notable among them. And while first Pieter Paul Rubens and then Pieter Bruegel the Elder met with increasing art-historical interest following Belgium’s assertion of independence in 1830, a dogged nationalistic approach to their oeuvres meant that the city in which they lived and worked did not generate much attention in its own right. It was the artist as Flemish genius, and not the city as stimulus, that mattered.

New Book: Agnès Penot, La Maison Goupil, Mare & Martin publishers

La maison Goupil.
Galerie d’art internationale au XIXe siècle, by Agnès Penot

Between 1846 and 1884, one of the most successful French art dealers of its time, Goupil & Co, developed a marketing strategy that employed an international network of alliances to expand its sales of art – prints, paintings, drawings and sculptures. Their focus during that time was mainly on contemporary European Salon artists. Newly established offices in New York, London, The Hague, Berlin and Brussels were linked to the headquarters in Paris. For example, William Schaus and later Michael Knoedler concentrated on the American market while Vincent Van Gogh, an uncle of the painter, facilitated business relations with the Netherlands. The firm was a profitable business. Its many branches and its participation in most major international events, such as the Universal Expositions were an ever-renewable source of clients and artists. As a result, many international museums owned – and sometimes still own – at least one piece of artwork with a Goupil & Co provenance. This dissertation analyses the stock books that were used to record sales in Paris and which reveal themselves to be an invaluable source of the Nineteenth Century art market, especially as it relates to the history of taste and collecting.

Agnès Penot is an independent art historian and a specialist in 19th century French art, the art market, and provenance.

Published in French
ISBN : 979-10-92054-56-9
€ 39,00

La Maison Goupil – Buy the book here

 

Visual Resources, Volume XXXIII, Nos. 1-2, 2017

The latest number of the journal Visual Resources, published by Routledge/Taylor and Francis, presents a Special Issue Guest-Edited by MEAGHAN CLARKE and FRANCESCO VENTRELLA (University of Sussex), entitled ‘Women’s Expertise and the Culture of Connoisseurship’.
This issue has many articles that may interest the historian of the art market (especially appealing for those concerned with the linkages between the market and art historiography), such as ‘Mrs. Berenson, Mrs. Gardner and Miss Toplady: Connoisseurship, Collecting and Commerce in London (1898–1905)‘ by MACHTELT ISRAELS, and  ‘“This Feminine Scholar”: Belle da Costa Greene and the Shaping of J.P. Morgan’s Legacy‘, by art market scholar FLAMINIA GENNARI SANTORI.

Visual Resources Vol. 33 Continue reading “Visual Resources, Volume XXXIII, Nos. 1-2, 2017”