Book Out Now: Lynn Catterson ed., Dealing Art on Both Sides of the Atlantic, Brill

A Discount Code for this second book in the HCAM series is available to all TIAMSA members.
Please log in and find the Discount Code for Brill post in the Members’ Only Section.

Flyer Dealing Art (.pdf)

 

TIAMSA at Art Basel: Newspaper Coverage in Il Sole 24 Ore

The conversation co-organized by TIAMSA and Art Basel in June was the subject of an extensive, very positive newspaper article in the Milanese daily “Il Sole 24 Ore”, written by Silvia Simoncelli (25 June 2017, no. 768, p. 20).
The article is available for TIAMSA members in the Members Only area of our website.
If you are a TIAMSA member, please log in.

 

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Abstracts now online: TIAMSA’s The Art Fair Conference abstracts

TIAMSA’s  The Art Fair  Conference  
13-15 July 2017
Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London

Here we attach the abstracts to the talks of the upcoming event.
We look forward to welcoming our speakers and participants to this exciting programme, focusing on art fairs from 16th-century panden via the creation of documenta to Art Basel now.

TIAMSA The Art Fair Conference Abstracts
(.pdf, 871 KB)

 


New Book: Agnès Penot, La Maison Goupil, Mare & Martin publishers

La maison Goupil.
Galerie d’art internationale au XIXe siècle, by Agnès Penot

Between 1846 and 1884, one of the most successful French art dealers of its time, Goupil & Co, developed a marketing strategy that employed an international network of alliances to expand its sales of art – prints, paintings, drawings and sculptures. Their focus during that time was mainly on contemporary European Salon artists. Newly established offices in New York, London, The Hague, Berlin and Brussels were linked to the headquarters in Paris. For example, William Schaus and later Michael Knoedler concentrated on the American market while Vincent Van Gogh, an uncle of the painter, facilitated business relations with the Netherlands. The firm was a profitable business. Its many branches and its participation in most major international events, such as the Universal Expositions were an ever-renewable source of clients and artists. As a result, many international museums owned – and sometimes still own – at least one piece of artwork with a Goupil & Co provenance. This dissertation analyses the stock books that were used to record sales in Paris and which reveal themselves to be an invaluable source of the Nineteenth Century art market, especially as it relates to the history of taste and collecting.

Agnès Penot is an independent art historian and a specialist in 19th century French art, the art market, and provenance.

Published in French
ISBN : 979-10-92054-56-9
€ 39,00

La Maison Goupil – Buy the book here

 

First meeting of TIAMSA’s Berlin sub-committee

First meeting of TIAMSA’s Berlin sub-committee
Berlin, 3 July 2017, 7.00pm

Christine Howald and Anne Luther generously hosted the successful launch of TIAMSA’s Berlin sub-committee, an event attended by a dozen local TIAMSA members who engaged in a lively conversation on a range of future activities and the state of art market studies in Berlin and internationally. The next meeting will be in September (date tbc) with a trip to the private archive of Gerd Harry Lybke, gallery owner of Galerie Eigen + Art.
We are excited for new members to join the group and would love to hear from you. Herzliche Grüße! Anne and Christine

Anne Luther contact@anneluther.info
Christine Howald c.howald@tu-berlin.de

CFP: Changing Places, Altering Spaces, AAANZ, Perth, (Dec, 2017)

Changing Places, Altering Spaces:
The Translocation of Modern Art from 1918 to 1939
AAANZ 2017 – Call for Papers

Session Convenor(s):
DAVID CHALLIS (University of Melbourne) and DIANA J KOSTYRKO (Australian National University)
Submit proposals to: David Martin Challis dchallis@student.unimelb.edu.au

It is a remarkable fact that of the thirty-seven paintings representing one of Paul Cézanne’s most iconic motifs, Mont Sainte-Victoire – also one of France’s most recognisable natural geographic features – only one painting from the series can be found in France today. The others are scattered among public and private collections in locations as diverse as Buenos Aires, Amsterdam, Zurich, Tokyo, Moscow, New York and Edinburgh. This is an example of how radically art can be removed from its natural and spiritual ‘home’ and it introduces a raft of considerations, one being: does art acculturate as it travels outwards, or might it otherwise be absorbed into an existing canon and even re-contextualized? This session is principally concerned with the dynamics of the modern art market in the interwar period; therefore we invite papers which tackle the phenomenon of the wholesale shifting of artworks out of Europe, for instance, and whether this was driven by entrepreneurial art dealers, auction houses and collectors, for self-interested purposes, or whether there were greater economic, aesthetic or political forces at work. We welcome papers which present case-studies where fashion has dictated collecting practices; when art coming to market has set new trends in acquisition; or instances where an artwork’s reputation has suffered or gained from changing hands, particularly in moving between public and private sectors.

The deadline for proposals is Monday 14 August 2017.

See the AAANZ guidelines here (.pdf)

 

CFP: Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?, CAA 2018

Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?
Call for Papers, CAA 2018

Chairs:
Christian Huemer (Getty Research Institute, CHuemer@getty.edu),
Valérie Kobi (Universität Bielefeld, valerie.kobi@uni-bielefeld.de),
Valentina Locatelli (Kunstmuseum Bern, valentina.locatelli@gmail.com)

This session will explore the intersections between provenance research and connoisseurship with regard to the early modern period. In order to go beyond today’s dominant understanding of provenance research as a practice exclusively related to Nazi-looted art and questions of restitutions, the panel will deliberately focus on topics from the late fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. By setting this alternative chronological limit, we will delve into the historical role of provenance research, its tools and significations, and its relation to connoisseurship and collecting practices. What influence did the biography of an artwork exert on the opinion of some of the greatest connoisseurs of the past? How did the documented (or suspected) provenance of a work of art impact its attribution and authentication process? Which strategies were employed in the mentioning of provenance information in sale catalogues or, sometimes, directly on the artworks themselves? Did the development of art historical knowledge change the practice of provenance research over time? And finally, how can we call attention to these questions in contemporary museum practice and reassess provenance research as a tool of connoisseurship? In addition to addressing the history as well as the strategies of provenance research, this session will be an opportunity to question its relationship to other domains as well as to bring it closer to core problems of art history and museology. We invite contributions that introduce new historical and methodological approaches. Proposals which go beyond the case study are especially encouraged.

For submission guidelines:
http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf

Paper proposals are due August 14. Please email your proposal to both chairs.