TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.

TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.
PUBLISHED ON 7th August 2018 by Julie Codell
CAA session for The International Art Market Studies, deadline extended to Aug 15: The Studio as Market
Chair: Julie F. Codell
Email: julie.codell@asu.edu

Artists’ studios have been the site of workshops, collaboration, promotion, mystery, and myth, at times considered a hallowed space, at other times a disreputable one. They have also been the places of social, political, and economic transactions that shape aesthetic values. In the studio artists self-fashioned their social status and promoted their works. They invited critics, dealers, and patrons into their studios turning studios into sites that combined a presumed mysterious creative energy with economic exchange while purposely misapprehending economic considerations. This session will explore how artists from the eighteenth century on under dwindling church and aristocratic patronage strategically entered the “free” market by using their studios to promote and sell works in conjunction with creating marketable public identities to engage buyers and generate symbolic capital for their name and their work. Topics can include the nature and function of the studio in the free market, artists’ strategies to both engage in economic activities and misrecognize economics in the studio, the studio as a site of conflicts over agency in overlapping aesthetic and economic transactions or as an exhibitionary site to display the creative process itself, the studio’s combined production and reception functions, among other topics.

By August 15 send submission materials: CAA form (at http://www.collegeart.org/…/programs/conference/CFP-form.pdf), 1-2 pg CV and 250-word proposal– to Julie Codell, Arizona State University, at julie.codell@asu.edu

TIAMSA CAA session Studio as Market, deadline extended to Aug 15.

CAA session for The International Art Market Studies, deadline extended to Aug 15: The Studio as Market
Chair: Julie F. Codell
Email: julie.codell@asu.edu

Artists’ studios have been the site of workshops, collaboration, promotion, mystery, and myth, at times considered a hallowed space, at other times a disreputable one. They have also been the places of social, political, and economic transactions that shape aesthetic values. In the studio artists self-fashioned their social status and promoted their works. They invited critics, dealers, and patrons into their studios turning studios into sites that combined a presumed mysterious creative energy with economic exchange while purposely misapprehending economic considerations. This session will explore how artists from the eighteenth century on under dwindling church and aristocratic patronage strategically entered the “free” market by using their studios to promote and sell works in conjunction with creating marketable public identities to engage buyers and generate symbolic capital for their name and their work. Topics can include the nature and function of the studio in the free market, artists’ strategies to both engage in economic activities and misrecognize economics in the studio, the studio as a site of conflicts over agency in overlapping aesthetic and economic transactions or as an exhibitionary site to display the creative process itself, the studio’s combined production and reception functions, among other topics.

By August 15 send submission materials: CAA form (at http://www.collegeart.org/…/programs/conference/CFP-form.pdf), 1-2 pg CV and 250-word proposal– to Julie Codell, Arizona State University, at julie.codell@asu.edu

Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market

In this blog, our member Dr. Anne Luther, a researcher and software developer at The Center for Data Arts at The New School and for Professor Boris Groys at NYU, questions some of the recent practices by speculating collectors looking to make quick profits from the market of contemporary art. A similar call to blacklist so-called flippers was recently made by Thaddaus Ropac at the Barcelona Talking Galleries Conference (16-17 January 2017).

Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market (pdf., 109kB)

A plea for a more sustainable art market
by Anne Luther

New York is the center of the international contemporary art market. [footnote 1] Local actors are tightly interconnected, and one can understand strategies and mechanisms of the market in a much more traceable way than in anywhere else. The city has major museums and institutions; the significant auction houses host their ‘record auctions’ here; the most successful galleries are surrounded by an unparalleled density of galleries; and art fairs, art magazines, and art schools are abundant. The network of people working in this local art world is therefore incomparable to other cities: artists, artist assistants, art handlers, writers, art advisors, curators, gallerists and their staff are part of a tightly knit and highly social network that spans art production and collecting. Private collectors have a major influence in this network and have changed the art market in the past five years significantly.
The following will describe the most notable mechanisms responsible for a change in art production in this time period. I will use the term emerging to point to actors in the art world that, in the past five to eight years, appeared for the first time in institutional presentations, art fairs, auctions, and art magazines. Emerging therefore indicates a performance or realization within the art market and is shaped by the network that produces sales, reviews, and institutional recognition of the produced artworks. Continue reading “Anne Luther: A Plea for a More Sustainable Art Market”