CFP: Hucksters or Connoisseurs? CAA 2018

Hucksters or Connoisseurs?
The Role of Intermediary Agents in Art Economies
Call for Papers, CAA 2018

Chairs:
Titia Hulst, Purchase College, New York, titiahulst@gmail.com;
Anne Helmreich, Texas Christian University, alhelmreich@gmail.com

The roles of art dealers in the creation of art economies and the circulatory exchange of goods have come to increasing attention of late. However, much work remains to be done to counter the long history of the hagiographic treatment of dealers, which owes a great deal to the fact that histories of dealers were largely authored by dealers eager to write themselves into the history of art.

For this session, we seek to bring a critical and historical perspective to the role of intermediary agents in the primary and secondary markets. We seek papers that will examine dealers who mediated between the artist as producer and the consumer, whether conceived as an individual patron or broadly configured audiences.

We also seek papers that identify strategies developed by these intermediary figures in response to changing social-historical as well as geographical conditions. Relatedly, what role did dealers play in the emergence of art history as a discipline and the construction of its narratives given the vested interest of these agents in knowledge formation and collection building?

Since histories of art dealers have long been dominated by narratives drawn from the Western market, we are particularly interested in papers that examine the role of this figure in non- western art economies as well as topics that help us test and question standard models derived from the early modern and modern Western context. We encourage analysis of historically grounded strategies and practices, as opposed to anecdotal heroic narratives.

Paper proposals are due August 14. Please email your proposal to both chairs.

 

CAA-GETTY INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

The CAA-Getty International Program, generously supported by the Getty Foundation, provides funding to between fifteen and twenty art historians, museum curators, and artists who teach art history to attend CAA’s Annual Conferences. The goal of the project is to increase international participation in CAA, to diversify the association’s membership, and to foster collaborations between North American art historians, artists, and curators and their international colleagues.

Since it began in 2012, the program has brought ninety scholars to the conferences, from forty-one countries located in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Each year, a preconference colloquium on international topics in art history inaugurates the week, kicking off four days of conference sessions, meetings with new colleagues, and visits to museums and galleries. Subsequent to these events, the program has generated many scholarly collaborations, including publications, conferences, and exhibitions. Continue reading “CAA-GETTY INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM”

PUBL.: Art History and the Global Challenge. Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6,1

Art History and the Global Challenge.
A Range of Critical Perspectives.

Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6,1

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/artlas/

For this special issue of the Artl@s Bulletin, the editors asked a diverse group of scholars to share their perspectives on the “Global turn” and the ways the “Digital turn” is affecting it.
This survey must be regarded as a dialogue in progress: other conversations will follow and will contribute to widening the range of critical perspectives on art history and the Global challenge gathered in this issue.

*
Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel (email)
Maître de conférences HDR, Ecole normale supérieure, université PSL – Paris Sciences Lettres

Catherine Dossin (email)
Associate Professor, Purdue University, Lafayette

Continue reading “PUBL.: Art History and the Global Challenge. Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6,1”

CONF: A difficult legacy. Colonial objects and postcolonial insights – Schwieriges Erbe. Koloniale Objekte — Postkoloniales Wissen

Conference 24 April, 2017

Linden-Museum, Hegelplatz 1, 70174 Stuttgart

Abteilung für Ethnologie, Universität Tübingen; Ludwig-Uhland-Institut
für Empirische Kulturwissenschaft, Universität Tübingen; Linden-Museum
Stuttgart, Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde
Registration deadline 06.04.2017

How does one engage with colonial objects in museums? Which insights do these objects provide and how can they be exhibited? What do these objects tell us about our present society? More…. (in German)

Program

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

Revisiting Rediscovery: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century

 Call for Papers
Ghent, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Jun 1, 2017

Francis Haskell famously argued that the “rediscovery” of early Netherlandish painting in the nineteenth century was central to the notions of history and culture that undergirded the rise of the modern nation-states of Belgium and the Netherlands. This view has been enriched by recent scholarship on the medieval and Renaissance revivalist movements that took hold in both countries from about 1840 through the early years of the twentieth century. Yet the complex relationship between artistic and literary practices of the period and the emergence of a distinctly northern European history of art remains largely unexamined, and its implications unacknowledged.

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The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s

New Sales Data Trace the First Hundred Years
of the British Auction Market

The Getty Provenance Index has, for three decades, been a leading resource for scholarship on the history of collecting. Founded in the early 1980s by Burton Fredericksen, the first curator of paintings for the Getty Museum, the Provenance Index has evolved into a collection of online databases with 1.75 million records indexing the works of art described in source documents such as auction catalogs, archival inventories, and dealer stock books. This data can be used to trace the ownership of works of art and to examine patterns in collecting and art markets.

Read Eric Hormell’s full announcement about the exciting addition of 138,000 database records on ‘the Getty iris’.

CFP : Images, Copyright, & the Public Domain in the 19th Century (Winterthur, 29-30 Mar 18)

Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library, Paris VII Diderot, March 29 – 30, 2018

Deadline: Feb 1, 2017

In partnership with LARCA (Laboratoire de recherches sur les cultures anglophones), Université Paris Diderot

A combination of technological, cultural, and economic factors during the “long” nineteenth century made images more readily available in a wider range of media than ever before. These transformations raised new questions about the ownership and use of images. Working in the new field of lithography, artists produced portraits, topographical landscapes, caricatures, everyday scenes, and representations of events done “on the spot,” which publishers distributed quickly and relatively cheaply. Thanks to changes in printing techniques and the commercial strategies of publishers, engraved images became more common in books, magazines, and newspapers. The development of photography led to the production and circulation of images in the form of daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, cartes-de-visite, and stereographs. The quest to reproduce photographic images in print inspired numerous photomechanical processes that raised questions about the status of the image and its creator.

Continue reading “CFP : Images, Copyright, & the Public Domain in the 19th Century (Winterthur, 29-30 Mar 18)”