CONF: Objects of Exchange: Art and Economic Encounters (Paris, 7-8 Sep 17)

International Symposium
Institut National d’Histoire de l’art (INHA)
Paris, 07. – 08.09.2017

Org. Alexander Alberro (Columbia University), Sophie Cras (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Exchange is classically described by economists as a phenomenon of equalization of values within a given system. When heterogeneous orders of economic rationalities meet, material objects and practices come to embody the paradoxes of dissonant exchange. This symposium aims to explore how artifacts and artistic practices have materialized ruptures within, and encounters between, economic systems in the modern and contemporary period.

PROGRAM

7 September 2017

2.oo pm / Introduction, Alexander Alberro (Columbia University) & Sophie Cras (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) Continue reading “CONF: Objects of Exchange: Art and Economic Encounters (Paris, 7-8 Sep 17)”

Abstracts now online: TIAMSA’s The Art Fair Conference abstracts

TIAMSA’s  The Art Fair  Conference  
13-15 July 2017
Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London

Here we attach the abstracts to the talks of the upcoming event.
We look forward to welcoming our speakers and participants to this exciting programme, focusing on art fairs from 16th-century panden via the creation of documenta to Art Basel now.

TIAMSA The Art Fair Conference Abstracts
(.pdf, 871 KB)

 


Apply Now: 5 Scholarships, ZEGK Heidelberg

The interdisciplinary doctoral research group “Art, Culture and Markets –History of European Culture from the 18th Century to the Present” of the Center for European History and Cultural Studies (ZEGK) at the University of Heidelberg is funded by the Landesgraduiertenförderung and delighted to grant five scholarships starting from October 2017 that may be held for up to three years. Consisting of a monthly stipend of 1.000€, the scholarships additionally encompass a lump sum payment of 110€ per month for material and travel expenses and, if necessary, a family allowance (all payments are in accordance with the Landesgraduiertenförderungsgesetz of 23rd July 2008).

The doctoral research group will examine the interweavings of culture and economy in Europe in a diachronic perspective via referring to the examples of markets for art, music, and religion. It will be supported by the professorships for Economic and Social History, Public History, History of the Early Modern Period, Early Modern and Contemporary Art History, Musicology, and for Religious Studies. The group’s interdisciplinary shaped projects will be supervised by two professors of the respective disciplines and will discuss three central research questions:

  • How are ideas and concepts of the relationship of culture and market shaped?
  • Which historical manifestation of cultural industry might be detected?
  • Are there reciprocal impacts between economic practices and artistic-cultural production discernible, and if so, how are these intertwinings carved out?

An accompanying study program will support the scientific qualification of the scholarship holders and help them to get their bearings at the beginning of their academic careers. The development and implementation of the projects will crop up in an interdisciplinary environment.

In addition to the usual application documents in English or German, a proof of an above-average final degree (M.A. or equivalents) in one of the subjects engaged, a short proposal of the interdisciplinary PhD-Project (max. 5.000 characters without spaces) and certificated language skills in all required languages as well as in English are expected. The elected scholars will necessarily have to live on-site in order to participate in the study program.

The applications shall be submitted online via a joint PDF-file to the spokepersons of the doctoral research group Prof. Dr. Katja Patzel-Mattern and Prof. Dr. Cord Arendes, att. Mr. Nils Steffen (email: nils.steffen@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de).

The application deadline is 10th August 2017. Subsequently, interviews will take place at the end of August, probably at 24th August.

In areas where women are underrepresented, the University of Heidelberg is striving to increase the proportion of women and therefore strongly encourages qualified women to participate in the application process. Disabled persons with corresponding aptitude for the positions will be favoured.

———

Kontakt/Contact

Prof. Dr. Katja Patzel-Mattern, Prof. Dr. Cord Arendes
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Zentrum für Europäische Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaft

Mail
katja.patzel-mattern@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de
cord.arendes@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de

Reference: STIP: 5 Promotionsstipendien, ZEGK Heidelberg. In: H-ArtHist, Jul 5, 2017.

CFP: The Art Market Dictionary

The Art Market Dictionary

http://www.artmarketdictionary.com/

The Art Market Dictionary (AMD) is the first reference work providing encompassing information on commercial art galleries, dealers, auction houses, fairs and advisers in Europe, the USA and Canada in the 20th and 21st centuries. Its c. 5,000 entries present basic data, overviews of company / individual histories and networks, information about artists exhibited / represented, bibliographies and archival information. Due to appear in 2019, the AMD will be published as an online searchable database and in print.

Written by an established international network of hundreds of authors, the AMD is edited by Johannes Nathan together with fourteen international Section Editors and a dedicated editorial team at De Gruyter Publishers, Berlin. The AMD is also supported by a distinguished international advisory board and a number of specialized institutions such as the Getty Research Institute, the Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, or the Archives of American Art.

Thanks to fantastic support from authors and institutions worldwide, we will soon accomplish the remaining steps and are now calling scholars and students who may have been unaware of the AMD. We are currently particularly focused on North American, Italian, French, Netherlandish, and Belgian subjects. However, authors with expertise in other areas are also welcome to send inquiries as a few further entries are still unassigned. We are also keen to get in contact with authors who may be willing to write several entries on selected areas.

Authors’ remuneration depends on the number of entries they write. If you would like to request more information or to contribute, please visit the AMD’s website at artmarketdictionary.info or contact Emily Evans, AMD Editor: e.evans@artmarketdictionary.info

CFP: Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?, CAA 2018

Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?
Call for Papers, CAA 2018

Chairs:
Christian Huemer (Getty Research Institute, CHuemer@getty.edu),
Valérie Kobi (Universität Bielefeld, valerie.kobi@uni-bielefeld.de),
Valentina Locatelli (Kunstmuseum Bern, valentina.locatelli@gmail.com)

This session will explore the intersections between provenance research and connoisseurship with regard to the early modern period. In order to go beyond today’s dominant understanding of provenance research as a practice exclusively related to Nazi-looted art and questions of restitutions, the panel will deliberately focus on topics from the late fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. By setting this alternative chronological limit, we will delve into the historical role of provenance research, its tools and significations, and its relation to connoisseurship and collecting practices. What influence did the biography of an artwork exert on the opinion of some of the greatest connoisseurs of the past? How did the documented (or suspected) provenance of a work of art impact its attribution and authentication process? Which strategies were employed in the mentioning of provenance information in sale catalogues or, sometimes, directly on the artworks themselves? Did the development of art historical knowledge change the practice of provenance research over time? And finally, how can we call attention to these questions in contemporary museum practice and reassess provenance research as a tool of connoisseurship? In addition to addressing the history as well as the strategies of provenance research, this session will be an opportunity to question its relationship to other domains as well as to bring it closer to core problems of art history and museology. We invite contributions that introduce new historical and methodological approaches. Proposals which go beyond the case study are especially encouraged.

For submission guidelines:
http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf

Paper proposals are due August 14. Please email your proposal to both chairs.

TIAMSA @ Art Basel Conversation, 15 June 2017

Public/ Private | New Rules: Is the Artworld a Mature Industry?

Art Basel and TIAMSA are teaming up in one of their round tables known as ‘Conversation‘:

New Rules: Is the Artworld a Mature Industry?

TIAMSA will be represented by Olav Velthuis, TIAMSA president and Johannes Nathan, TIAMSA Chair.

This talk addresses the rapidly changing business environment of art. Across the artworld, established but opaque ways of doing business are increasingly seen as a hindrance, not an advantage. Governments are eager to enact regulations, investment-minded collectors and analysts are pressing for greater transparency. Information is flowing more freely: It is no longer a question of whether data becomes available, but when, where, and on whose terms. The institutional sector is also under scrutiny, as funders demand accountability and clarity about the role of private interests. How will the artworld keep up with these developments? What can be done to modernize and professionalize the market without stifling its dynamism? What are the new rules of the art economy to follow?

Lindsay Pollock, former Editor-in-Chief, Art in America, New York; Olav Velthuis, Professor, Department of Sociology at University of Amsterdam, and President, TIAMSA, Amsterdam; Adam Sheffer, Partner, Cheim & Read, and President, Art Dealers Association of America, New York; Pierre Valentin, Partner, Constantine Cannon LLP, London; Bob Rennie, Collector, Vancouver.

Moderator: András Szántó, Author and Cultural Consultant, New York.

CONF: Annual Third Year Postgraduate Symposium (London, 8-9 Jun 17)

London, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Somerset House, Strand, June 8 – 09, 2017
Registration deadline: Jun 7, 2017

The Courtauld’s New Research Symposium 2017 is a platform for third-year PhD candidates to present and exchange their research to their peers, the wider scholarly community and the public. Ranging from medieval England to contemporary Bosnia-Herzegovina via Renaissance Florence the conference will bring questions concerning materiality, identity and institutions to bear on art and politics. Whether performing a close analysis of a late-fifteenth-century altarpiece frame or a Marxist reading of photographic technologies after the 2008 financial crisis, what are the pressing methodological questions for the discipline? This conference provides a place to consider how the cohort has been collectively thinking through critical challenges and new directions for the History of Art.

Including a keynote by Lynda Nead (Pevsner Professor of History of Art, Birkbeck, University of London)

Free, all welcome, but booking required:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/annual-third-year-postgraduate-symposium-tickets-34656949870

Attendees are welcome to come to a single session if they wish.

PROGRAM for Part of Friday, June 9

11:30–12:25 Session 6: Modernisms, Materials, Markets

Giovanni Casini: ‘A Dealer’s “Dictatorship”? Giorgio de Chirico, Léonce Rosenberg and the Parisian Art Market in the late 1920s’

Rachel Mustalish: ‘Arthur Dove: Modernism through Materials’

12:30–13:25 Session 7: Collections and Canons

Naomi Speakman: The Virtuoso Appetite: The Medieval Antiquities of Ralph Bernal’

Imogen Tedbury: ‘After the “game of grab”: collecting, displaying and selling Sienese painting after the “Burlington Magazine wars” of 1903’