PUB: ‘Studies in the History of Collecting and Art Markets – A Study in the Social History of Art’ (Vol. 5) by Paolo Coen

We are very pleased to offer TIAMSA Members 25% discount on this wonderful publication – for details and further information, please log into your TIAMSA Members Area!

Recent interest in the economic aspects of the history of art have taken traditional studies into new areas of enquiry. Going well beyond provenances or prices of individual objects, our understanding of the arts has been advanced by research into the demands, intermediaries and clients in the market.
Eighteenth-century Rome offers a privileged view of such activities, given the continuity of remarkable investments by the local ruling class, combined with the decisive impact of external agents, largely linked to the Grand Tour. This book, the result of collaboration between international specialists, brings back into the spotlight protagonists, facts and dynamics that have remained unexplored for many years.

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Happy Reading!

CONF: Postwar Narratives of Collecting (Rome, 14 Dec 18)

Rome, Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, December 14, 2018

Why do we collect, how do we legitimise it for ourselves or for others, and what does that say about our culture? Collecting as a practice has been studied from various perspectives, beginning with Julius von Schlosser who in 1908 regarded it as a characteristic trait of the human soul – collecting objects was part of an inborn urge. Based on Lacan, Mieke Bal sustained the same in her famous essay on collecting, but then from a narrativist perspective – each collection is an on-going narrative for the collector as an individual by which means (s)he sublimates anxieties. Meanwhile, the collecting of contemporary art has attracted a lot of scholarly and critical attention in the last decades, but the discussion of this phenomenon decidedly deviated from the psychological perspective by focusing on the economic aspects of the art markets and their global development, the postcolonial situation, interculturality and the rise of the non-western artist. While the former, psychological perspective suggests that collecting does not change over time, the latter strand of research starts from the assumption that indeed collecting has very recently changed, quite radically even, turning into a global phenomenon.

The present workshop, organized by Arnold Witte, aims to open up a new perspective by building on both traditions but confronting the underlying assumptions. It starts with the observation that after 1945 the acquisition of contemporary art works became ever more important for a growing public – thanks to new buyers and as a result of government policies in industrialized countries – and institutions such as museums who increasingly collected contemporary art. Furthermore, new actors appeared on the scene, such as auction houses and corporate art collections. Businesses started to buy or commission contemporary art in order to embellish their employees’ offices or show it to a wider public. Belonging to this latter group are also non-profit institutions such as hospitals, which embraced art as part of their medical philosophy. Finally, artists and galleries were confronted with new expectations and adjusted their art and strategies to this new situation by incorporating, avoiding or refuting these narratives.

All these changes created the need for new legitimations that took the form of narratives, invented to justify the act of collecting for individuals, institutions and governments. It could also lead to counter-narratives, in the form of an art that defied the market, as in the case of (early) Arte Povera. These narratives also have implications for how then and now art was and is defined. This workshop aims to explore these narratives and their dynamics, by mapping the various motives formulated by actors in the field of collecting between 1945 and the early 2000s, in order to explore in what ways the act of collection adapted to the ideologies of the post-war era.

Programme:
14:00 to 19:00

Jim Carter (American Academy in Rome):
-Industry, Culture and the New Humanism in Postwar Italy: The Case of Il Menabò – Jim Carter

Sara Piccinini (Collezione Maramotti)
-Collezione Maramotti. An out of fashion art collecting

Sabrina Kamstra (Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam)
-Why collecting for an Academical medical center?

Monika Kackovic (University of Amsterdam)
-Identify with your employer? You probably like the Art: A study on identity orientations and organizational non-core activities

Jan de Groot (University of Amsterdam)
-History for legitimacy: how curators of corporate art collections explain their acquisition decisions

Francesca Gallo (Università di Roma La Sapienza)
-Interview with Giuseppe Garrera on collecting

Workshop: International Workshop The Artist as an Entrepreneur & Career Paths, HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, December 17-18, 2018

The series of workshops is organised by ART-Dev University Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, Creative Economy-HKU, and IESA & Institute of Historical Research, London.

This is the second of a series of three international workshops aimed at bringing together scholars from different disciplines and areas of study of the art market, to confront issues in the history of the art market with those of contemporary practice, and to shed light on common patterns and differences, with a focus on the ir strategic impact on the market.

Application Deadline Dec. 7th, 2018

Registration form 

Full programme

 

CFP: Art Market and Art Collecting (Berlin/Paris, Nov 18/Mar 19)

ART MARKET AND ART COLLECTING FROM 1900 TO THE PRESENT IN GERMANY AND FRANCE

German-French Research Programme
Berlin, Germany, 8–10 November 2018
Paris, France, 11–13 March 2019

Deadline: Sep 14, 2018

Refugee crises, trade wars, migration debates: within the context of global geopolitical, economic and cultural-political upheavals, Europe is presently undergoing a process of transformation. At the same time, European territorial occupations and colonial rule of the past are coming increasingly into the focus of national and transnational scholarship and the politics underlying it.

The 2018–2019 German-French Research Programme organised by the Forum Kunst und Markt/Centre for Art Market Studies of the Technische Universität Berlin and the Centre Georg Simmel of the Paris-based École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in cooperation with the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris responds to these dynamics. Continue reading “CFP: Art Market and Art Collecting (Berlin/Paris, Nov 18/Mar 19)”

Call for Papers: Arts Special Issue — Art Markets and Digital Histories

Arts Special Issue: Art Markets and Digital Histories

Deadline: Jun 15, 2018

A Special Issue of Arts will investigate the promises and pitfalls of current digital methods in studying the history of art markets. New technologies are becoming integral to research in the humanities and social sciences and this invites a reflection on the use of these methods and techniques in art market studies. Our aim is to explore the different strategies that scholars employ to navigate and negotiate digital techniques and data sources, particularly when combining different datasets and types. Furthermore, the wealth of digitized historical data on objects and agents in art markets is rapidly expanding, and this data is increasingly published as Linked Open Data. Two recent historiographical trends make the use of Linked Data particularly relevant to art market studies.

First of all, the history of art markets has since long been studied through economic, social, and cultural lenses. While some scholars opt for the one or the other, others try to integrate them through the topics of, for instance, intermediaries, market mediation, and valuation processes. Open access to digital assets from art museums, archives, and libraries provide the opportunity, in the form of linked data and combined sources, to test cross-overs between research domains and thereby expand our understanding of art markets as socio-cultural as well as economic phenomena. But translating the promise of Linked Data into actual conceptual leaps in the field requires careful design of data models and methodologies.

The second trend also concerns the boundaries of the art market, but on a spatial level. The geographical reach of historical art market studies has been extended beyond Europe and the United States to include Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Australia. At the same time, scholars have developed increasing interest on themes such as cross-border trade and networks, global vs. national vs. local, and migration and mobility patterns. In theory, digitization and linked data provide excellent opportunities for advanced cross-border and comparative analyses, but in practice it has proven difficult to systematically link or compare data across borders and languages.

For this issue, we seek contributions that present a historical research question relevant to art market studies. We are particularly interested in contributions that reach out to other domains (be they time, place, or societal), and that place emphasis on combining and using multiple sources or data types (linked or not linked). There are no limitations as to place or time, as long as the papers are explicit on their research processes with regards to data, techniques and methods. Continue reading “Call for Papers: Arts Special Issue — Art Markets and Digital Histories”

Series of Lectures on Art and the Art Market

Vortragsreihe des Forums Kunst und Markt (Series of Lectures at the Forum of Art and Art Market), Berlin, 23 Apr-9 Jul 18

Institut für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik, Fachgebiet Kunstgeschichte der Moderne, Technische Universität Berlin, 23.04. – 09.07.2018

Vortragsreihe des Forums Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies
am Institut für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik, Fachgebiet Kunstgeschichte der Moderne, Technische Universität Berlin

In dieser Vortragsreihe werden aktuelle Forschungen zu den historischen und gegenwärtigen Spannungsfeldern und Dynamiken zwischen Kunsthandel, Kunstpolitik und institutionalisierter Kunstwelt präsentiert und zur Diskussion gestellt.

Lecture series PROGRAM Sommer Semester 2018:

Continue reading “Series of Lectures on Art and the Art Market”

CFP: Markets and their Agents (Basel, 21-22 June, 18)

Arbeitskreis für spätmittelalterliche Wirtschaftsgeschichte
21.06.2018-22.06.2018
Hirschgässlein 21
4051 Basel

Deadline: 04.04.2018

Markets and the agents who shaped and created them are the subject of the 6th annual conference of the research group on premodern economic history. Markets feature prominently in recent research. Discussions cover the questions, for example, how a market can be grasp as a place, an event or a mechanism of exchange, or whether premodern economies have just hosted markets or if some of them can even be regarded as market economies. Continue reading “CFP: Markets and their Agents (Basel, 21-22 June, 18)”