Call for Papers: Journal for Art market Studies – Translocations

Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik

Call for Papers
Journal for Art Market Studies
Issue on
“Translocations and the Art Market”
https://www.fokum-jams.org

Deadline abstract (2,000 characters): 15 June 2017
Deadline article (30,000 characters): 31 October 2017

Since 2017 the Institute for Art History and Historical Urban Studies at Technische Universität Berlin has been publishing the Open Access Journal for Art Market Studies (JAMS). As part of the Institute’s well established Centre for Art Market Studies, the publication presents interdisciplinary research results on the past and present art market. The Journal conforms to Open Access standards including website submission through www.fokum-jams.org and peer reviews. Articles are published both as pdf and in HTML format, they are DOI registered and usually subject to a CC BY-NC copyright license.

For January 2018 we are planning an issue on the subject of “Translocations and the Art Market”, guest-edited by Professor Bénédicte Savoy. It will focus on the role of the art market in territorial displacements of cultural assets since antiquity. The context for this issue of the journal will be the wide research area outlined in the Leibniz Project Cluster “Translocations”, which will explore different forms, consequences, directions and backgrounds of such translocations. However, contributions to this issue of the journal should focus specifically on art market research.

The following research areas are outlined in the Project Cluster and may serve as impulses for contributions to the journal:

  • Art trade, art theft and trophy enterprise in Antiquity (for example through analysis of antique forms of the market, transports, and presentation of translocated cultural assets)
  • The art trade in Europe during the period of the Discovery of the World during the Middle Ages and early modern era (for example, examining trade transactions in art during the crusades, European conquests in South America, the wars of religion and the Thirty Years War)
  • The trade in cultural assets and its dispersion in diasporas in recent and early modern times (for example analysing the role of the art market in translocating cultural goods from Italy, Greece, Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia-Pacific, and the Americas)
  • Expropriation and translocation of cultural assets in the context of the great wars of the twentieth century (for example with respect to art theft by the National Socialists, museum sales in Russia as a consequence of the Revolution, Soviet “trophy seizures”, and later the trade in dispossessed art in the GDR)

Please submit your abstract for an article by 15 June 2017 to Susanne Meyer-Abich
s.meyer-abich@tu-berlin.de

Reference: Fokum-Jams, Susanne Meyer Abich.

JOB: 2 pos­i­tions – Research Assist­ant (Postdoc), ‘Translocations’, TU Berlin

Salary grade E13 TV-L Ber­liner Hoch­schu­len

“We Want to Go Back Home” – caricature published for the sale of Yves Saint Laurent’s & Pierre Bergé’s collection (2009) Lupe © www.cl2000.com

Part-time employ­ment may be pos­sible

The research cluster “Trans­lo­ca­tions” at the Insti­tute for Art His­tory and His­tor­ical Urban Stud­ies at the Tech­nis­che Uni­versität Ber­lin is seek­ing to hire two postdoc­toral research­ers for its team. The pro­ject is fun­ded through the Gottfried Wil­helm Leib­niz-Prize of the DFG, awar­ded to Prof. Dr. Béné­dicte Savoy in 2016. The research cluster will study large-scale dis­place­ments of cul­tural assets from antiquity to the 20th cen­tury such as: art theft and spo­li­ation organ­ized by the state in times of war and occu­pa­tion, seizure of cul­tural goods dur­ing colo­ni­al­ism, dis­place­ments as a res­ult of a par­ti­tion of excav­a­tion dis­cov­er­ies or research exped­i­tions, mater­ial dia­spora of entire civil­iz­a­tions exped­ited by the art trade, and con­fis­ca­tions jus­ti­fied through ideo­logy, nation­al­iz­a­tion, or en masse dis­posal of private prop­erty. The key object­ive of “Trans­lo­ca­tions” is to com­pile a com­pre­hens­ive selec­tion of his­tor­ical find­ings in order to deliver ori­ent­a­tion and dir­ec­tion for deal­ing with the chal­lenges posed by this topic now and in the future. For fur­ther inform­a­tion on the research cluster see www.kuk.tu-berlin.de/menue/translocations/parameter/en. Continue reading “JOB: 2 pos­i­tions – Research Assist­ant (Postdoc), ‘Translocations’, TU Berlin”

ANN: Art & Law (Cambridge, 18 Jan-8 Mar 17)

Cambridge Art History Research Seminar Series on the theme ‘ART & LAW’

Cambridge, Department of History of Art, January 18 – March 8, 2017

 The series will commence on Wednesday, 18th January and take place every Wednesday at 5:00pm in Lecture Room 2 at the Department of History of Art. All are welcome to attend.

18 January
Jilleen Nadolny (Principal Investigator, Art Analysis & Research)
Connoisseurship, Provenance and the Laboratory: Establishing Authenticity in the 21st Century Art World

Continue reading “ANN: Art & Law (Cambridge, 18 Jan-8 Mar 17)”

CONF: Fourth Annual Art and Cultural Heritage Crime Symposium (New York, 1-3 Nov 16)

nyu-scps-logo

New York University, New York, U.S.A, November 1 – 03, 2016

Registration deadline: Nov 3, 2016

The 2016 Art and Cultural Heritage Crime Symposium hosted by NYU SPS, will be held at the NYU Woolworth Building in New York from November 1 – 3, 2016. Co-founded by Jane C.H. Jacob, Art Vérité LLC; Alice Farren-Bradley, Museum Security Network; and Christopher A. Marinello, Art Recovery Group LTD and launched in 2013 at NYU’s London Campus, this year’s program includes a stellar roster of topics and speakers from the US and Europe.

CLE units and financial aid are available for those who qualify. Attorneys attending the symposium can earn 16 CLEs in Professional Practice: 6.5 CLEs (November 1), 6.5 CLEs (November 2), and 3.0 CLEs (November 3). CLEs are transitional.

The full symposium discount rate is only available to NYU students, alumni, faculty, and adjunct faculty, as well as to NYSBA members.

DAY ONE: THEFT and FRAUD (6.5 CLEs)

DAY TWO: LOOTING and DESTRUCTION (6.5 CLEs)

Program

Source School of Professional Studies NYU (accessed Oct 28, 2016)