CONF: A difficult legacy. Colonial objects and postcolonial insights – Schwieriges Erbe. Koloniale Objekte — Postkoloniales Wissen

Conference 24 April, 2017

Linden-Museum, Hegelplatz 1, 70174 Stuttgart

Abteilung für Ethnologie, Universität Tübingen; Ludwig-Uhland-Institut
für Empirische Kulturwissenschaft, Universität Tübingen; Linden-Museum
Stuttgart, Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde
Registration deadline 06.04.2017

How does one engage with colonial objects in museums? Which insights do these objects provide and how can they be exhibited? What do these objects tell us about our present society? More…. (in German)

Program

Lecture online – Nicola Kritzinger: The Journey of a man with a fish

After the Conference WORKING ON THINGS in November 2016 researcher Nicola Kritzinger here presents her paper The Journey of a man with a fish here in a YouTube Video.

‘An unassuming, seemingly rudimentary ceramic figure sits in storage for years, surrounded by innumerable objects also relegated to containers. Even in its apparent silence and obscurity, thepresence and displacement of this object reveals something of an expansive history; various social histories, including a number political eras from the imperial, to the colonial, and eventual democracy; and relates something of the construction of value systems for art, objects and museums across these periods. It hints at the work implicit in every museum object.’

New Book: Iain Robertson, Understanding Art Markets (Routledge, 2016)

Iain Robertson, Understanding Art Markets. Inside the World of Art and Business (Routledge, 2016)

red book cover with Uncle Sam, Napoleon, etc. Book by Iain Robertson called 'Understanding Art Markets'

This recently published textbook integrates, updates and enhances the author’s previous books, Understanding International Art Markets (2005) and The Art Business (2008). Part I (’Technical and Structural Mechanisms’), looks at defining issues such as underlying legal and ethical questions or the structure of commodity markets. The book’s central section (Part II, ’The Markets for Art’) surveys the structures of today’s art markets – notably those for old masters, impressionist, modern and contemporary art – but also provides fascinating vistas of the art markets of previous centuries. Part II also includes an illuminating chapter on Chinese Art – a must read for those wishing to gain a better understanding of the underlying values that define the art market in China today. Finally, part III considers ‚external factors‘ such as aspects of art investment, or the roles of the state and the museums. ‚In claiming that the international art market reflects us, Iain Roberson holds up a mirror every bit as beguiling as Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray‘ (Alistair Hicks, Author of The Global Art Compass: New Directions in 21st Century Art). – Iain Robertson is Head of Art Business Studies at Sotheby’s Institute of Art and a TIAMSA member.

CFP : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums

Frederick MacKenzie, The National Gallery when at Mr J.J. Angerstein's House, Pall Mall, 1824-34, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Frederick MacKenzie, The National Gallery when at Mr J.J. Angerstein’s House, Pall Mall, 1824-34, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

CALL FOR PAPERS : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums

University of Leeds, 30th-31st March 2017

Deadline for Abstracts: Tuesday 1st November 2016

 

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Susanna Avery-Quash, Senior Research Curator (History of Collecting) at the National Gallery, London

This two-day conference investigates the relationships between ‘private’ collections of art (fine art, decorative art and antiquities), and the changing dynamics of their display in ‘public’ exhibitions and museums. This shift from ‘private’ to ‘public’ involves a complex dialectic of socio-cultural forces, together with an increasing engagement with the art market. The conference aims to explore the relationship between the ‘private’ and ‘public’ spheres of the home and the museum, and to situate this within the scholarship of the histories of the art market and collecting. Continue reading “CFP : Private Collecting and Public Display: Art Markets and Museums”