CFP: New Voices 2017-18: Art and Movement (Birmingham, 11 Jan 18)

Call for Papers
Art and Movement

University of Birmingham, January 11, 2018
Association for Art History
Deadline: September 4, 2017

Keynote speaker: Professor Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Whether moved by force, trade or choice, art and artists rarely remain static. In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in particular, globalised systems of travel, communication, and trade have meant that art and the art world, including artists, curators and dealers, are perceptively more mobile. Yet, artists have always moved in response to the availability of work and materials, or for cultural and educational opportunities. Artists have also long depicted people or objects in movement, from paintings of the flight into Egypt to contemporary installations of the belongings of refugees.

‘New Voices: Art and Movement’ will give postgraduate and doctoral researchers an opportunity to discuss the topic of art and movement and to address persistent historical, contextual, and conceptual questions.

  • How did art participate in or resist the creation of our globalised world, and how has that system impacted the creation and reception of art?
  • How can the development of systems and networks for the circulation of art be traced historically?
  • What can the movement of art tell us about specific works of art or cultural, political, economic and social contexts?
  • In what way does the form of an object reflect its movements or movability?
  • How and why has movement been represented through the ages?

The time has perhaps never been more apt to question the way art travels and moves, or the way movement influences the production, curation and reception of art. We welcome contributions from all periods that address the theme. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Representations of movement or its impact on a work of art’s function and form
  • The lives and work of artists abroad, including immigrants, expatriates and refugees
  • Networks of trade and circulation
  • The impact of globalisation on the production of art, its curation and the art market
  • The restitution of art and cultural objects
  • Non-movement, i.e. art or artists that resist or are denied movement

Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words for 20-minute papers along with a 150-word biographical note to artmovement2018@gmail.com by 4 September 2017. The submission of abstracts is open to postgraduate researchers (master’s and doctoral) of all related disciplines; attendance is open to all.
For more details, see: www.forarthistory.org.uk

For this year’s New Voices we have affiliated with a related conference at the University of Birmingham. This conference, entitled ‘Art on the Move – Mobility in the Long Nineteenth Century‘, will be held over two days following New Voices. Attendees and contributors to New Voices are encouraged to attend, although they are separate events and admission is charged separately. For more information please visit: https://artonthemove19.wordpress.com/

Source: CFP: New Voices 2017-18: Art and Movement (Birmingham, 11 Jan 18). In: H-ArtHist, Jul 11, 2017.

Review: Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp

Christine Göttler, Bart Ramakers, and Joanna Woodall, eds.
Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp 
Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, 64. Leiden: Brill, 2014. 400 pp.;
180 color ills. Cloth
$157.00(9789004272156)

Nadia Baadj
Jan van Kessel I (1626–1679): Crafting a Natural History of Art in Early Modern Antwerp
(Studies in Baroque Art) (Dutch Edition).
Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 208 pp.;
52 color ills.; 50 b/w ills. Cloth
$150.00(9781909400238)

Review by Marisa Anne Bass
CrossRef DOI: 10.3202/caa.reviews.2017.90

The history of art in early modern Europe would be unthinkable without Antwerp. And yet until quite recently, Antwerp was a place that nobody talked much about. Scholarship on the southern Netherlandish city (now part of Belgium) long remained the province of local historians, the indefatigable Floris Prims notable among them. And while first Pieter Paul Rubens and then Pieter Bruegel the Elder met with increasing art-historical interest following Belgium’s assertion of independence in 1830, a dogged nationalistic approach to their oeuvres meant that the city in which they lived and worked did not generate much attention in its own right. It was the artist as Flemish genius, and not the city as stimulus, that mattered.

Call for Papers: Journal for Art market Studies – Translocations

Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik

Call for Papers
Journal for Art Market Studies
Issue on
“Translocations and the Art Market”
https://www.fokum-jams.org

Deadline abstract (2,000 characters): 15 June 2017
Deadline article (30,000 characters): 31 October 2017

Since 2017 the Institute for Art History and Historical Urban Studies at Technische Universität Berlin has been publishing the Open Access Journal for Art Market Studies (JAMS). As part of the Institute’s well established Centre for Art Market Studies, the publication presents interdisciplinary research results on the past and present art market. The Journal conforms to Open Access standards including website submission through www.fokum-jams.org and peer reviews. Articles are published both as pdf and in HTML format, they are DOI registered and usually subject to a CC BY-NC copyright license.

For January 2018 we are planning an issue on the subject of “Translocations and the Art Market”, guest-edited by Professor Bénédicte Savoy. It will focus on the role of the art market in territorial displacements of cultural assets since antiquity. The context for this issue of the journal will be the wide research area outlined in the Leibniz Project Cluster “Translocations”, which will explore different forms, consequences, directions and backgrounds of such translocations. However, contributions to this issue of the journal should focus specifically on art market research.

The following research areas are outlined in the Project Cluster and may serve as impulses for contributions to the journal:

  • Art trade, art theft and trophy enterprise in Antiquity (for example through analysis of antique forms of the market, transports, and presentation of translocated cultural assets)
  • The art trade in Europe during the period of the Discovery of the World during the Middle Ages and early modern era (for example, examining trade transactions in art during the crusades, European conquests in South America, the wars of religion and the Thirty Years War)
  • The trade in cultural assets and its dispersion in diasporas in recent and early modern times (for example analysing the role of the art market in translocating cultural goods from Italy, Greece, Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia-Pacific, and the Americas)
  • Expropriation and translocation of cultural assets in the context of the great wars of the twentieth century (for example with respect to art theft by the National Socialists, museum sales in Russia as a consequence of the Revolution, Soviet “trophy seizures”, and later the trade in dispossessed art in the GDR)

Please submit your abstract for an article by 15 June 2017 to Susanne Meyer-Abich
s.meyer-abich@tu-berlin.de

Reference: Fokum-Jams, Susanne Meyer Abich.

JOB: 2 pos­i­tions – Research Assist­ant (Postdoc), ‘Translocations’, TU Berlin

Salary grade E13 TV-L Ber­liner Hoch­schu­len

“We Want to Go Back Home” – caricature published for the sale of Yves Saint Laurent’s & Pierre Bergé’s collection (2009) Lupe © www.cl2000.com

Part-time employ­ment may be pos­sible

The research cluster “Trans­lo­ca­tions” at the Insti­tute for Art His­tory and His­tor­ical Urban Stud­ies at the Tech­nis­che Uni­versität Ber­lin is seek­ing to hire two postdoc­toral research­ers for its team. The pro­ject is fun­ded through the Gottfried Wil­helm Leib­niz-Prize of the DFG, awar­ded to Prof. Dr. Béné­dicte Savoy in 2016. The research cluster will study large-scale dis­place­ments of cul­tural assets from antiquity to the 20th cen­tury such as: art theft and spo­li­ation organ­ized by the state in times of war and occu­pa­tion, seizure of cul­tural goods dur­ing colo­ni­al­ism, dis­place­ments as a res­ult of a par­ti­tion of excav­a­tion dis­cov­er­ies or research exped­i­tions, mater­ial dia­spora of entire civil­iz­a­tions exped­ited by the art trade, and con­fis­ca­tions jus­ti­fied through ideo­logy, nation­al­iz­a­tion, or en masse dis­posal of private prop­erty. The key object­ive of “Trans­lo­ca­tions” is to com­pile a com­pre­hens­ive selec­tion of his­tor­ical find­ings in order to deliver ori­ent­a­tion and dir­ec­tion for deal­ing with the chal­lenges posed by this topic now and in the future. For fur­ther inform­a­tion on the research cluster see www.kuk.tu-berlin.de/menue/translocations/parameter/en. Continue reading “JOB: 2 pos­i­tions – Research Assist­ant (Postdoc), ‘Translocations’, TU Berlin”

Brosens, Koenraad, review of Sandra Van Ginhoven’s ‘Connecting Art Markets’

Sandra van Ginhoven, Connecting Art Markets. Guilliam Forchondt’s Dealership in Antwerp (c.1632–78) and the Overseas Paintings Trade, Studies in the History of Collecting & Art Markets I, Christian Huemer ed., Boston (Brill) 2017. ix, 288 pp., 71 full color ill. ISBN 9789004319745; E-ISBN 9789004334830


Sandra van Ginhoven’s Connecting Art Markets. Guilliam Forchondt’s Dealership in Antwerp (c.1632–78) and the Overseas Paintings Trade is an ambitious and valiant book. The result of doctoral dissertation research conducted at Duke University under the auspices of Hans J. Van Miegroet and Neil De Marchi, the study is a beautifully argued analysis of the commercial activities and strategies of pivotal Antwerp art entrepreneur Guilliam Forchondt (1608–1678) between about 1643 and 1678. It explores and explains the entrepreneurship of this chef d’enterprise in an unassuming, highly effective and pioneering manner. Continue reading “Brosens, Koenraad, review of Sandra Van Ginhoven’s ‘Connecting Art Markets’”