L: Raphael for Prince Eugene of Savoy (Vienna, 13 Dec,17)

Raphael for Prince Eugene of Savoy: The Oeuvre in the Albertina, Its Provenance and the Role of the Mariette
Lecture by Antoinette Friedenthal

 

13 December 2017, 6.15pm

Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Universitätscampus Hof 9
Seminarraum 1
Garnisongasse 13
1090 Vienna

The genesis of Prince Eugene of Savoy’s outstanding  collection of prints has hardly been researched so far. One of its most prized holdings, particularly coveted by the Prince, is an extensive Raphael oeuvre (today in the Albertina), consisting of seven large folio volumes that contain the prints after Raphael by contemporary and later engravers. Like the bulk of the collection, the Raphael oeuvre had been assembled and catalogued in 1717/18 by the Parisian bookseller, publisher and print dealer Jean Mariette in cooperation with his now more famous son Pierre-Jean Mariette. The lecture by Antoinette Friedenthal – who is currently preparing an annotated edition of the correspondence between Jean Mariette and Pierre-Jean Mariette, 1717-1719 – will explore this important chapter in the history of connoisseurship.

Link: http://kunstgeschichte.univie.ac.at/einzelansicht/news/raffael-fuer-prinz-eugen-das-oeuvre-in-der-albertina-seine-provenienz-und-die-rolle-der-mariette/

CFP: Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek, vol. 69

Connoisseurship and the Knowledge of Art in the Netherlands, 1400 to the present

Connoisseurship has long been suspect. Though essential to the study of material objects, it has been opposed to the more ‘substantive’ discipline of academic art history, and reviled as outmoded and elitist, as tainted by the market, and as concerned merely with such artist-reifying/mystifying issues as attribution, authenticity and the autograph ‘hand’. The connoisseur – with typically his ‘eye’ – has been dismissed as a dinosaur. Continue reading “CFP: Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek, vol. 69”

New Book out now: Markt und Macht. Der Kunsthandel im »Dritten Reich«

Markt und Macht. Der Kunsthandel im »Dritten Reich«

Ed. Fleckner, Uwe; Gaehtgens, Thomas W. and Huemer, Christian
Series: Schriften der Forschungsstelle “Entartete Kunst” 12
xvi, 434 pages
Language: German, English

Buy the book here – Markt und Macht

Die Geschichte des Kunsthandels im “Dritten Reich” zu schreiben, steht nicht nur aufgrund einer schwierigen Quellenlage vor besonderen Herausforderungen. Zwischen Komplizenschaft und Sabotage verstrickt sich das Handeln der Akteure in eklatante Widersprüche. Vom Alltagsgeschäft der Kunsthändler bis zum Widerstand gegen restriktive Vorschriften reicht das Themenspektrum, vom Auktionshandel bis zum Schwarz- und Schattenmarkt, von zahllosen Verbrechen nicht nur an jüdischen Sammlern und Händlern bis zum Kunstraub in den von deutschen Truppen besetzten Ländern. Kunst- und Wirtschaftshistoriker untersuchen in diesem Buch den Kunstmarkt und seine Mechanismen im Nationalsozialismus, die Rolle der Raubkunst sowie insbesondere moderner und “entarteter” Werke auf dem Kunstmarkt im “Dritten Reich”.

CFP: Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?, CAA 2018

Provenance Research as a Method of Connoisseurship?
Call for Papers, CAA 2018

Chairs:
Christian Huemer (Getty Research Institute, CHuemer@getty.edu),
Valérie Kobi (Universität Bielefeld, valerie.kobi@uni-bielefeld.de),
Valentina Locatelli (Kunstmuseum Bern, valentina.locatelli@gmail.com)

This session will explore the intersections between provenance research and connoisseurship with regard to the early modern period. In order to go beyond today’s dominant understanding of provenance research as a practice exclusively related to Nazi-looted art and questions of restitutions, the panel will deliberately focus on topics from the late fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. By setting this alternative chronological limit, we will delve into the historical role of provenance research, its tools and significations, and its relation to connoisseurship and collecting practices. What influence did the biography of an artwork exert on the opinion of some of the greatest connoisseurs of the past? How did the documented (or suspected) provenance of a work of art impact its attribution and authentication process? Which strategies were employed in the mentioning of provenance information in sale catalogues or, sometimes, directly on the artworks themselves? Did the development of art historical knowledge change the practice of provenance research over time? And finally, how can we call attention to these questions in contemporary museum practice and reassess provenance research as a tool of connoisseurship? In addition to addressing the history as well as the strategies of provenance research, this session will be an opportunity to question its relationship to other domains as well as to bring it closer to core problems of art history and museology. We invite contributions that introduce new historical and methodological approaches. Proposals which go beyond the case study are especially encouraged.

For submission guidelines:
http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf

Paper proposals are due August 14. Please email your proposal to both chairs.

CFP: Hucksters or Connoisseurs? CAA 2018

Hucksters or Connoisseurs?
The Role of Intermediary Agents in Art Economies
Call for Papers, CAA 2018

Chairs:
Titia Hulst, Purchase College, New York, titiahulst@gmail.com;
Anne Helmreich, Texas Christian University, alhelmreich@gmail.com

The roles of art dealers in the creation of art economies and the circulatory exchange of goods have come to increasing attention of late. However, much work remains to be done to counter the long history of the hagiographic treatment of dealers, which owes a great deal to the fact that histories of dealers were largely authored by dealers eager to write themselves into the history of art.

For this session, we seek to bring a critical and historical perspective to the role of intermediary agents in the primary and secondary markets. We seek papers that will examine dealers who mediated between the artist as producer and the consumer, whether conceived as an individual patron or broadly configured audiences.

We also seek papers that identify strategies developed by these intermediary figures in response to changing social-historical as well as geographical conditions. Relatedly, what role did dealers play in the emergence of art history as a discipline and the construction of its narratives given the vested interest of these agents in knowledge formation and collection building?

Since histories of art dealers have long been dominated by narratives drawn from the Western market, we are particularly interested in papers that examine the role of this figure in non- western art economies as well as topics that help us test and question standard models derived from the early modern and modern Western context. We encourage analysis of historically grounded strategies and practices, as opposed to anecdotal heroic narratives.

Paper proposals are due August 14. Please email your proposal to both chairs.

 

CFP: Changing Hands: When Art History Meets the Art Market, TIAMSA CAA 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS
Changing Hands: When Art History Meets the Art Market
TIAMSA @CAA 2018

Through case studies, this session proposes to consider how the art market has adapted, expanded and at times significantly clashed with modern and contemporary art practices as artworks have changed hands.  Papers should illuminate how issues relating to fabrication, re-fabrication and conservation have challenged traditional conceptions of authenticity and authorship, redefined connoisseurship and set precedents for both institutional and private collectors.
We hope that papers will also attempt to assess how the art market may have affected these issues.

  • Under what conditions have artists disavowed works, for example Donald Judd’s renunciation of works fabricated by Giuseppe Panza, Cady Noland’s disavowal of Cowboys Milking and Log Cabin and Bruce Connor’s disavowal and subsequent reinstatement of CHILD?
  • Conversely, how have artists maintained authorship over multiple versions or remakes of their work as they have been sold? How has the unprecedented presence of living artists in the market changed and challenged the marketplace?

This session encourages papers reflecting a variety of perspectives, including but not limited to art historians, conservators, visual arts lawyers, collectors, dealers, curators and artists. It will also provide a forum for discussion of the intersection of theory and practice, as disconnects between them are often illuminated as art changes hands.

See the call for participation (.pdf).

Your proposal should be emailed to Véronique Chagnon-Burke (VChagnon-Burke(at)christies.edu) and Julie Reiss (JReiss(at)christies.edu)
Papers are due by August 14, 2017.

Visual Resources, Volume XXXIII, Nos. 1-2, 2017

The latest number of the journal Visual Resources, published by Routledge/Taylor and Francis, presents a Special Issue Guest-Edited by MEAGHAN CLARKE and FRANCESCO VENTRELLA (University of Sussex), entitled ‘Women’s Expertise and the Culture of Connoisseurship’.
This issue has many articles that may interest the historian of the art market (especially appealing for those concerned with the linkages between the market and art historiography), such as ‘Mrs. Berenson, Mrs. Gardner and Miss Toplady: Connoisseurship, Collecting and Commerce in London (1898–1905)‘ by MACHTELT ISRAELS, and  ‘“This Feminine Scholar”: Belle da Costa Greene and the Shaping of J.P. Morgan’s Legacy‘, by art market scholar FLAMINIA GENNARI SANTORI.

Visual Resources Vol. 33 Continue reading “Visual Resources, Volume XXXIII, Nos. 1-2, 2017”