L: Denise Vernerey-Laplace (EHESS): ‘Denise René and the Fight for Abstraction. Promoting Abstract Aesthetics (1944-2012)’, 8 March, Paris

galerie denise rené, 196 Boulevard saint germain Paris 7
Denise René

Denise Vernerey-Laplace (EHESS): ‘Denise René and the Fight for Abstraction. Promoting Abstract Aesthetics (1944-2012)’, 8 March, Paris.

In 1944, a young women called Denise René opened a gallery in her apartment-boutique, rue La Boétie. Little did she know then that her engagement in political and intellectual debates would lead her to vigorously support abstraction and cinetism for fifty years. Her ‘Operation Klar Form’, first organized for Liège in 1951, would over the course of its stations in European capitals take abstraction to the art market, setting the path for the abstract aesthetics of Vasarely, Calder, Tinguely, Agam, Bury, Soto, Schoeffer, as well as widening the spectrum of the kinetic arts in Germany, Venezuela, Argentina, and Spain.

Denise René died at the age of 99, on 9 July 2013. She was active until the very last days of her life. A verbally outspoken person, she hoisted the flag for abstract aesthetics and Op Art with her galleries at rue La Boétie, the Marais, and Saint-Germain.

Venue: GREMA – Groupe de recherche sur le marché de l’art
8 March 2017
5-7pm
Centre Malher de l’Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
9 rue Malher, salle 106
(M° Saint-Paul)

EXH : Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971, Sept 30 – Jan 29, 2017

Virginia Dawn, Franz Kline painting, 1962 by Dennis Hooper. Source: Pinterest
Virginia Dawn, Franz Kline painting, 1962 by Dennis Hooper. Source: Pinterest

The remarkable career of gallerist and patron Virginia Dwan will be featured front and center for the first time in an exhibition of some 100 works, featuring highlights from Dwan’s promised gift of her extraordinary personal collection to the National Gallery of Art. Founded by Dwan in a storefront in Los Angeles in 1959, Dwan’s West Coast enterprise was a leading avant-garde space in the early 1960s, presenting works by abstract expressionists, neo-dadaists, pop artists, and nouveaux réalistes, including Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Edward Kienholz, Yves Klein, Arman, Martial Raysse, Niki de Sant Phalle, and Jean Tinguely. In 1965, Dwan established a gallery in New York where she presented groundbreaking exhibitions of such new tendencies as minimalism, conceptual art, and land art, featuring works by Carl Andre, Walter de Maria, Dan Flavin, Michael Heizer, Robert Morris, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, Charles Ross, Robert Ryman, and Robert Smithson, among others. Dwan emerged as a leading patron of earth works during this period, sponsoring Heizer’s monumental sculptures Double Negative (1969) and City (begun 1972); Smithson’s masterpiece Spiral Jetty (1970); the first version of Walter de Maria’s Lightning Field (1974); and Ross’s Star Axis (begun 1971). The exhibition will trace Dwan’s activities and the emergence of an avant-garde gallery in an age of mobility, when air travel and the interstate highway system linked the two coasts and transformed the making of art and the sites of its exhibition.

Organization: Organized by National Gallery of Art, Washington

Other Venues: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, March 19–September 10, 2017

Source : National Gallery of Art, Washington

Header Image (random): Virginia Dwan standing in the Language III installation (May 24–June 18, 1969). Detail. Photo courtesy Dwan Archive