New Resources Online: Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives announces the availability for research of the Margaretta M. Salinger records and the Textile Study Room records.

Margaretta M. Salinger records

Margaretta M. Salinger had a long and distinguished career at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 1930 she joined the Met’s Department of Paintings as Special Cataloguer, going on to become a Research Fellow, Senior Researcher and Associate Curator. In 1970 Salinger was named Curator in the European Paintings department, and upon her retirement in 1972 she was named Curator Emeritus. In addition to her curatorial work, Salinger was active on various Museum committees related to publications, most notably the Editorial Advisory Committee, which is the focus of the bulk of these records. Included are proposals for publications, notes from meetings, budget documents, memoranda and correspondence, mostly dating from the 1940s-1960s. There are several files as well from other committees on which Salinger served, mostly related to Museum publication projects. Finding aid: http://libmma.org/digital_files/archives/Margaretta_Salinger_records_b19413130.pdf

Textile Study Room records

The Textile Study Room of The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened in 1908. From then until the mid-1990s, when its activities were integrated into those of the Antonio Ratti Textile Center, the Textile Study Room was consulted by students, designers, and others seeking knowledge or inspiration from historical and contemporary examples of fabrics. In its early years, research supported by the Textile Study Room focused on European textiles and laces, as well as Japanese and Chinese textiles. The Textile Study Room frequently hosted lectures about its holdings by curators and specialists in the field. It also acquired photographs of fabrics and textiles from Central and South America, Asia, and India. The records include correspondence, invoices, fabric samples, photographs and other items that document the work of curators and other staff of this department over several decades. Finding aid:

http://libmma.org/digital_files/archives/Textile_Study_Room_records_b19447814.pdf

For information about access to these collections at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives, contact archives@metmuseum.org or visit our website at http://libmma.org/portal/museum-archives/.

Reference: WWW: New Art Historical Resources on the Web [4]. In: ArtHist.net, Oct 9, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16427>.

Apply Now: Leonard A. Lauder Fellowships in Modern Art

Deadline for all application materials, including transcripts and letters of recommendation: November 3, 2017, 5:00 p.m. (ET)

Founded in the spring of 2013, The Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art is a leading center for scholarship on modern art with a focus on Cubism and aims, through its various programs, to make critical contributions to the study of twentieth-century art. Continue reading “Apply Now: Leonard A. Lauder Fellowships in Modern Art”

STIP: Fellowships in Modern Art, New York

FELLOWSHIPS IN MODERN ART, NEW YORK

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, September 01, 2018

Application deadline: Nov 3, 2017

Founded in the spring of 2013, The Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art is a leading center for scholarship on modern art with a focus on Cubism and aims, through its various programs, to make critical contributions to the study of twentieth-century art.

Each year, The Metropolitan Museum of Art offers two fellowships in the Research Center to scholars studying Cubism or a related subject in modern art. One two-year position is intended for a predoctoral candidate who is embarking on his or her dissertation; the other fellowship is reserved for a qualified postdoctoral scholar at any stage of his or her career and may be one or two years in duration.

All Leonard A. Lauder Fellows are expected to contribute to the activities and programming of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art. All predoctoral fellowships must take place between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2020. All postdoctoral fellowships must take place between September 1, 2018 and (depending on the length of the fellowship) August 31, 2019 or August 31, 2020.

The stipend amount for one year is $45,000 for predoctoral fellows and $55,000 for postdoctoral fellows. During the fellowship period and at the Museum’s discretion, Leonard A. Lauder Fellows will be eligible to receive one or more travel stipends.

Fellowships in the Research Center offer an exceptional opportunity for scholars of modern art to conduct focused research on an independent project. As part of a larger cohort of Met Fellows, the Leonard A. Lauder Fellows will participate in the weekly gatherings and workshops organized by the Museum’s Education Department, in addition to those organized by the Research Center.

For application guidelines and additional information, visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/research/internships-and-fellowships/fellowships/leonard-a-lauder-fellowships

For more information about the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/laudercenter

Reference: STIP: Fellowships in Modern Art, New York. In: ArtHist.net, Sep 24, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16193>.

CFP: Writing Impressionism Into and Out of Art History (London, 3-4 Nov 17)

 

A man and woman walking under an umbrella in a Paris road, other walkers-by; costumes of ca. 1877.
Gustave Caillebotte – Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877; Art Institute of Chicago

London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, November 3 – 04, 2017
Deadline: Feb 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

Impressionism continues to be celebrated in blockbuster exhibitions worldwide: in the last few years alone, Impressionism, Fashion, Modernity (Art Institute of Chicago, Musée d’Orsay, and Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2013); Gustave Caillebotte: The Painter’s Eye (Kimbell Art Museum and National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 2015-2016); and Inventing Impressionism: Paul Durand-Ruel and the Modern Art Market (Musée du Luxembourg, National Gallery, London, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015). Since 1878 when Théodore Duret published his Histoire des peintres impressionnistes, Impressionism has occupied a central place in the canon of art history. That place now seems to be called into question, however. New transnational approaches to nineteenth-century art history have troubled the perpetuation of Francocentric histories. As the field’s attention has increasingly turned to places outside France—Britain, the United States, Australia, and beyond—Impressionism has been pushed to the margins. Though Impressionism has long benefited from powerful and compelling narratives via the social history of art, these readings have been worked through so extensively that it warrants asking whether this area of art history may be exhausted for the moment.

Continue reading “CFP: Writing Impressionism Into and Out of Art History (London, 3-4 Nov 17)”