CFP: World 3: Art History and Globalization

OCAT Institute, Beijing, China, June 12 – October 31, 2019

Call for Papers__World 3: Art History and Globalization (2018)

World 3 is an annually published academic journal organized by OCAT Institute. Taking art history as its basic orientation while exploring points of connectivity in other disciplines, the journal features original publications and Chinese translations of innovative thematic research in art history and theory, and in other relevant fields such as cultural, social, and intellectual history, the history of linguistics, psychology, philosophy, and religion. Other sections include review and commentary on associated international events, publications, exhibitions, and research institutions. The series offers a publishing platform for the research outcomes in related fields, and strives for the cultivation of new modalities of thinking and epistemology in Chinese scholarship.

World 3, as the core publication of OCAT Institute, was launched in 2014. It is printed in color and annually released in December.

The fifth volume of World 3 takes “Art History and Globalization” as the theme.

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PUB: Transatlantic Transactions and the Domestic Market: Agnew’s Stock Books in 1894–1895 by Barbara Pezzini and Alan Crookham

open access:

https://www.britishartstudies.ac.uk/issues/issue-index/issue-12/agnews-stock-books

This essay uses the case study of a prominent firm of art dealers, Thos. Agnew and Sons (Agnew’s), to present a methodological discussion of how digital tools can be used to investigate circulation and transnational exchange in the historical art market, highlighting how these tools offer new ideas and opportunities for research, but also present tensions and contradictions.

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PUB: Artl@s Bulletin vol. 8,1

Artl@s Bulletin vol. 8, issue 1 (Spring 2019).

Women Artists Shows.Salons.Societies (1870s-1970s)
Edited by Hanna Alkema and Catherine Dossin

Women Artists Shows·Salons·Societies: Towards a Global History of All-Women Exhibitions
Hanna Alkema and Catherine Dossin

Autour de Frances Benjamin Johnston, Gertrude Käsebier et Catharine Weed Barnes Ward : stratégies séparatistes dans l’exposition des femmes photographes américaines au tournant des XIXe et XXe siècles
Thomas Galifot

L’Esposizione internazionale femminile di Belle Arti (Torino, 1910-1911; 1913). Note su genere, arte e professione in Italia all’inizio del XX secolo
Francesca Lombardi

Les Polonaises s’organisent : les premières expositions de femmes artistes polonaises à l’orée du XXe siècle
Ewa Bobrowska

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PUB: The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Cultural Interchange, special issue, Medieval Encounters

We are pleased to inform you of the publication of Therese Martin, ed., The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Cultural Interchange, special issue, Medieval Encounters vol. 25, nos. 1-2 (2019), https://brill.com/view/journals/me/25/1-2/me.25.issue-1-2.xml

The articles in this double issue, selected from papers presented at a conference held at Princeton in 2017, center around the treasury of San Isidoro de León to address wider questions about the meanings of cross-cultural luxury objects and textiles in royal-ecclesiastical collections.

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PUB: ‘Art Crossing Borders – The Internationalisation of the Art Market in the Age of Nation States, 1750-1914’ ed. Jan Dirk Baetens and Dries Lyna

Art Crossing Borders offers a thought-provoking analysis of the internationalisation of the art market during the long nineteenth century. Twelve experts, dealing with a wide variety of geographical, temporal, and commercial contexts, explore how the gradual integration of art markets structurally depended on the simultaneous rise of nationalist modes of thinking, in unexpected and ambiguous ways. By presenting a radically international research perspective Art Crossing Borders offers a crucial contribution to the field of art market studies.

This publication is open access and can be freely downloaded directly from the Brill website here.

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PUB: Caterina Caputo, Collezionismo e mercato. La London Gallery e la diffusione dell’arte surrealista, Florence: Pontecorboli, 2018.

Research on the art market related to the avant-garde remains still largely unexplored today. The author of the present book aims to contribute to this field through a study of collecting, art market strategies, and networks that fostered and sustained Surrealism in the interwar and post-war periods in Britain. The volume focuses on the London Gallery, the only Surrealist gallery to be active in England since the end of the 1930s. It was managed by two Surrealist artists who were also collectors: the Belgian E.L.T. Mesens and the British Roland Penrose. The London Gallery opened in 1938, two years after the significant International Surrealist Exhibition held at the New Burlington Galleries in London, an exhibition followed by the foundation of the Surrealist British group.

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PUB: “From Florence to London to New York: J.P. Morgan’s Bronze Doors,” Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, vol. 16, no. 3, Autum by Lynn Catterson

This article, based on recently discovered material in several archives, tells the story of the bronze doors of the Morgan Library.[1] It narrates the travel of the allegedly Renaissance bronze doors from their acquisition in Florence in 1901, to their brief sojourn in London before arriving in New York to adorn the principal façade of McKim, Mead & White’s building. This case study also addresses the attribution of the work to Thomas Waldo Story (1855–1915) and analyzes his position within the complex social microcosm of the art market in which the acquisition of J. Pierpont Morgan’s doors took place.

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