CFP: The Place of Art. The Re-definition of the Exhibition Format in the ’70s

Critically reflecting on the history of exhibition and the canonization of its formats, this panel aims to investigate the development of the exhibitionary complex as it’s known today.

Political protests in the 70s occupied the whole public sphere, causing an epochal value change across culture, thought and politics. The process of democratization affecting cultural perceptions also impacted the art system. Many demonstrations, often in the form of interventions and performances, occurred as throughout the opening dates of the Venice Biennale.

While changing the functioning of its apparatuses, the exhibitionary complex (Bennet 1982) continued to provide instruments for the moral and cultural regulation. In their ability to mobilize and represent political exigencies of a specific moment in time, exhibitions became more specialised thanks to the adoption of diverse formats like biennials, fairs, temporary museum exhibitions, forums and books.

None of these models were new but, during the 70s, were used to respond to the needs of an expanding cultural sphere. Cologne and Basel’s art fairs, the exhibition choices made by Seth Siegelaub in January 5-31 1969 (New York 1969), and documenta 5, which opened the second wave of biennials (Green and Gardner 2016), are great example of these radical changes in exhibition’s formats.

We invite scholars to submit papers that examine specific exhibition formats which, during the 1970s, underwent a significant redefinition or explored methodological issues related to such topic

Please send a 250-word abstract (Chicago Manual of Style), using the CAA conference proposal form (see CAA, p. 41 of the following .pdf http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/programs/conference/CAA-CFP-2019.pdf ), and a brief 2-page CV by August 6, to cricci@iuav.it / clarissarricci@yahoo.it

Dr. Clarissa Ricci
Iuav University in Venice

Abstracts now online: TIAMSA’s The Art Fair Conference abstracts

TIAMSA’s  The Art Fair  Conference  
13-15 July 2017
Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London

Here we attach the abstracts to the talks of the upcoming event.
We look forward to welcoming our speakers and participants to this exciting programme, focusing on art fairs from 16th-century panden via the creation of documenta to Art Basel now.

TIAMSA The Art Fair Conference Abstracts
(.pdf, 871 KB)

 


CFP: Collateral Events and Pavilions at the Venice Biennale (St. Andrews, 24 Nov 17)

The Politics of Display: Collateral Events and Pavilions at the Venice Biennale

School of Art History, University of St Andrews, November 24, 2017
Deadline: Apr 24, 2017

During the late 1990s, the structure of the Venice Biennale underwent a dramatic overhaul, expanding into the Arsenale buildings that once housed the city’s shipyards and armouries. Its interconnecting rooms provide a counterpoint to the Giardini’s national pavilions, and the greater curatorial fluidity that this enables has been further extended through the introduction of collateral pavilions and events. These now proliferate throughout the Biennale, offering sites through which artists and curators can explore the charged issues of transnationalism, resurgent nationalism, and globalization. As was particularly evident in Okwui Enwezor’s 2015 Biennale, these interventions can resonate strongly with both Venice’s long history of maritime trading, and the current challenges it faces as a city inhabited primarily by tourists, in a continent struggling to respond coherently to the on-going refugee crisis, with an ecology that has been tangibly affected by climate change. While critics rightly continue to challenge the out-dated nature of the Biennale’s underlying structures, its vast expenditure and excess, and its imbrication in commercial markets, it is now an expanded and contested field of activity, in which the politics of representation and display are constant and highly charged. Continue reading “CFP: Collateral Events and Pavilions at the Venice Biennale (St. Andrews, 24 Nov 17)”