ANN: TIAMSA Session „Share and Connect: Databases for Art Market Studies” at CAA New York, 15 February 2019

New York City, 15 February 2019, 12:30-1:30pm – Share and Connect: Databases for Art Market Studies; TIAMSA session at the College Art Association (CAA) Conference (Chaired by Clarissa Ricci, Iuav University of Venice and Sandra van Ginhoven, Getty Research Institute); Location: New York Hilton Midtown, 2nd floor, ‘Nassau East’

Databases and digital techniques frequently challenge current approaches to research, not least through the introduction of a new vocabulary. While this opens some exciting perspectives, the use of such tools requires careful consideration and modelling of key concepts and relationships. This ‘Share and Connect’ meeting is open both to TIAMSA scholars and other colleagues interested in the use of databases and digital techniques for art market studies who wish to share their different methodological approaches, questions and insights. The aim of the meeting is to form an international group around the use of databases in art market studies in order to expand our field of inquiry. The discussion will be based on the input from the following brief presentations:

Fiene Leunissen, Research Scholar, Duke Art, Law & Markets Initiative, Duke University: Teaching Art Markets: Data Limitations & Alternative Metrics in the South Korean Auction Market

Nadine Oberste-Hetbleck, Junior Professor for Art History and Art Market, University of Cologne: ART | GALLERY GIS | COLOGNE – A Digital Mapping Project on the ART COLOGNE (1967– 1997)

Jeffrey Taylor, MGES Program Grosland Director, Western Colorado University: Measuring the US Art Market Using Labor and Tax Data

The session is open to all visitors of the CAA conference. Please note that you will not have to purchase access to the 2019 CAA Conference in order to attend!

ANN: TIAMSA Session „The Studio as Market” at CAA New York, 13 February 2019

New York City, 13 February 2019, 8:30-10:00am – The Studio as Market (Chaired by Julie Codell, Arizona State University) – TIAMSA-Session at the CAA (College Art Association) Conference; Location: New York Hilton Midtown, 3rd floor, Grand Ballroom West

Gustave-Courbet-The-Artists-Studio-1855-Musée-dOrsay

Artists’ studios have been the site of workshops, collaboration, promotion, mystery, and myth, at times considered a hallowed space, at other times a disreputable one. They have also been the places of social, political, and economic transactions that shape aesthetic values. In the studio artists self-fashioned their social status and promoted their works. They invited critics, dealers, and patrons into their studios, turning the latter into sites that combined a presumed mysterious creative energy with economic exchange while purposely misapprehending economic considerations. This session will explore how artists – facing dwindling church and aristocratic patronage from the eighteenth century on – strategically entered the “free” market by using their studios to promote and sell works in conjunction with creating marketable public identities to engage buyers and generate symbolic capital for their name and their work.

Julie Codell, Arizona State UniversityThe Studio as Market. Victorian Artists’ Studios as Public Spaces

Andrew Stephenson, Independent ScholarFrancis Bacon’ s London Studios – Before and After 1930

Sasha Davis, The Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation Designed to Impress: Chaim Gross and the Studio at 526 LaGuardia Place

Di Wang, University of Oxford Lunch at the Artist’ s Studio

Abstracts can be found at https://www.artmarketstudies.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/TIAMSA-panel-for-CAA-2019-NYC.pdf

Please note that you will have to purchase access to the 2019 CAA Conference in order to attend.

CFP: Volume: Art and Science of Collecting in 18th Cent. Europe

Deadline: Jan 30, 2019

Call for Essays:

“The Art and Science of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Europe”
Edited by Dr. Arlene Leis and Dr. Kacie Wills

We are inviting chapter abstracts for a collection of essays designed for academics, specialists and enthusiasts interested in the interrelations between art, science and collecting in Europe during the long 18th century. Considering a broad range of collections, (objects) and ideas, our volume will discuss the topic of art, science and collecting in diverse theoretical contexts, such as art historical, feminist, social, gendered, colonial, archival, literary and cultural ones. To accompany our existing contributions, we welcome essays that take a global and material approach, and are particularly keen on research that makes use of new archival resources. We encourage interdisciplinary perspectives and are especially interested in essays that reveal the way in which women participated in art, science, and collecting in some capacity.

The compendium will consist of around 15 essays 6000 words each (including footnotes), with up to four illustrations. In addition to these more traditional essays, we are looking for shorter (circa 1,000 words) case studies on material objects pertaining to collections/collectors from that period, and the subject of art, science and collecting will also be central to these contributions. These smaller pieces will each include one illustration.

The following topics/case studies are particularly desired:
– Women’s collecting interests
– Histories and methodologies of collecting, taxonomies, cataloging, arrangement, and modes of display
– Cabinets of curiosities/Wunderkammer
– Catalogues
– Collections housed in art and/or science institutions
– The boundaries between the natural and the artificial
– Scientific and artistic tools and instruments
– Seriality vs. rare objects
– Transitional objects
– Conservation
– Collecting networks
– The artist collector
– The scientist collector
– Science, art and collecting in domestic spaces
– Antiquarian collections
– Print culture

All inquiries should be addressed to Arlene Leis, aleis914@gmail.com or Kacie Wills, kacie.wills@gmail.com

Essay abstracts of 500 words and 300 word abstracts for smaller case studies are due January 30, 2019 and should be sent along with a short bio to: artsciencecollecting@gmail.com

Finished case studies will be due July 30, 2019, and due date for long essays will be September 30, 2019.


ANN: 6-month Residential Scholarship for the study of 20th-century glass-making art in Venice

A 6-MONTH RESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP FOR THE PURPOSE OF STUDYING 20TH-CENTURY GLASS-MAKING ART IN VENICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE, DOCTORAL OR POST-DOCTORAL THESIS

PERIOD OF RESIDENCE: APRIL – DECEMBER 2019

Application deadline: 28 February 2019

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CFP: American Art in the 1940s (Paris, 16-17 Apr 19)

Paris, April 16 – 17, 2019
Deadline: Feb 17, 2019

[Version française ci-dessous]

American Art in the 1940s: Global Currents, Local Tides. A Study Day in Memory of Professor François Brunet (L’Université Paris Diderot)

Professor of Art and Literature of the United States at the Université Paris Diderot and member of the Institut Universitaire de France, François Brunet (1960-2018) was a historian of art and visual culture of the United States, who specialized in the history of photography. Among his numerous publications are La Naissance de l’idée de photographie (P.U.F., 2000), Photography and Literature (Reaktion Books, 2009), the anthology Agissements du rayon solaire (Presses de l’U de Pau, 2009), and the edited volume L’Amérique des images, Histoire et culture visuelles des Etats-Unis (Hazan/Paris Diderot, 2013).

In 1949, American philosophers John Dewey and Arthur F. Bentley published Knowing and the Known, which laid out the fundamentals of transactionalism—a method of inquiry that emphasizes the collective and transactional nature of knowledge. In this view, the “transactional” is understood as an epistemological shift from the “interactional,” in which persons, objects, or ideas are organized as operating one upon another. Transactionalism challenges the notion of fixed causality, instead emphasizing a systematic approach to inquiry that locates its subject on the ever-dynamic nexus of space and time.

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CFP: Stedelijk Studies 9: Modernism in Migration

Deadline: Feb 20, 2019

Stedelijk Studies 9 (Fall 2019):

Modernism in Migration: Relocating Artists, Objects and Institutions, 1900–1960

THEME OUTLINE
In the production and reception of art, processes of migration play a crucial role. This is particularly true for modernism and the historical avant-gardes of the twentieth century, when artists’ transnational networks and migrations across countries and continents greatly impacted artistic developments. Besides artists and agents such as art dealers and art historians, works of art and art institutions also migrated. For an upcoming issue of Stedelijk Studies, we invite scholars to explore forms of migration and their influence on the development and dissemination of modern art around the world from 1900–1960.

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ANN: 3-month “Fondazione di Venezia” residential scholarships at Fondazione Giorgio Cini

PERIOD OF RESIDENCE: APRIL 2019 – APRIL 2020

Application deadline: 10 March 2019

The Fondazione Giorgio Cini has created one 3-month residential scholarship to enable Italian researchers who live abroad and children of Italian who emigrated abroad, to return to Italy for a study period at the Vittore Branca International Center for the Study of Italian Culture. The scholarship is worth 3,100 euros (gross sum) and 3 month accommodation free of charge in the Vittore Branca Center Residence in the period April 2019 – April 2020.

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