TIAMSA Blog: CAA 2019 TIAMSA Panel “The Studio as Market” abstracts ed. Julie Codell

At the College Art Association conference in New York City, Feb 13-16, 2019, TIAMSA, recently granted CAA-affiliate status, was allotted a 1½ hour panel session.  The organization’s committee selected the panel, “The Studio as Market” for 2019. The session was well-attended by 35-40 attendees.  This blog contains the abstracts for the panel itself and for each of the four papers presented on Feb 13.

Continue reading “TIAMSA Blog: CAA 2019 TIAMSA Panel “The Studio as Market” abstracts ed. Julie Codell”

Student Blog: TIAMSA Conference 2018 – Roundtable discussion – ‘The Art Market and the Internet’ by Lukas Fuchs

Following the inaugural TIAMSA conference in London in 2017, TIAMSA members met in Vienna, an equally rich city in art and culture, in late September 2018, for the second TIAMSA conference provocatively titled “ART FOR THE PEOPLE? QUESTIONING THE DEMOCRATIZATION OF THE ART MARKET”

The first of the three conference locations were the halls of Vienna’s annual contemporary art fair – viennacontemporary, which hosted TIAMSA’s opening public lecture “The Art Market and the Internet”. The Roundtable discussion featured five distinguished panellists: Marek Claassen (Founder and CEO, ArtFacts.Net), Kristina Kulakova (Head of Digital and PR, viennacontemporary), Sophie Neuendorf (Vice President – Strategic Partnerships, artnet Worldwide Corp.), Olav Velthuis (Professor of Sociology, University of Amsterdam/ TIAMSA President), and Johannes Nathan (Chair of TIAMSA / Co-founder of the Centre for Art Market Studies, TU Berlin).

Opening Roundtable discission from TIAMSA Confernce 2018 at viennacontemporary.
(L-R) Marek Claassen (Founder and CEO, ArtFacts.Net), Kristina Kulakova (Head of Digital and PR, viennacontemporary), Olav Velthuis (Professor of Sociology, University of Amsterdam), Sophie Neuendorf (Vice President – Strategic Partnerships, artnet Worldwide Corp.), and Johannes Nathan (Chair of TIAMSA / Co-founder of the Centre for Art Market Studies, TU Berlin).

Since the rise of the internet its impact on our society has grown to such an extent in recent years that it is hard to imagine a life without it. The music and film industries, for example, have been revolutionised by streaming services – so what is the situation in art, especially in the art market, and what changes are still ahead of us?

Continue reading “Student Blog: TIAMSA Conference 2018 – Roundtable discussion – ‘The Art Market and the Internet’ by Lukas Fuchs”

PUB: ‘How to become a judgment device: valuation practices and the role of auctions in the emerging Chinese art market’, Socio-Economic Review, 16 (3), 2018, pp. 459-477 by Svetlana Kharchenkova & Olav Velthuis

We are very happy to let you know about this publication by Svetlana Kharchenkova & Olav Velthuis!

This article studies the role of judgment devices in the emergence of markets for singularities. In particular, it seeks to understand how specific judgment devices become dominant in resolving uncertainty within these markets. Building on Karpik’s seminal theory, we argue that institutional environments (e.g. government regulations, political-economic factors, the level of informality within business environments) as well as the level of expertise of consumers, co-determine which devices come to be used in new markets. Empirically, we focus on the emerging market for contemporary art in China. While auctions and auction prices are widely used in valuing contemporary art in China, this is highly illegitimate in international art markets. We argue that auctions act as a judgment device in China because of strong government backing, because other validating organizations, such as museums and art critics, are seen as untrustworthy, and because auctions send strong, easily interpretable signals to novice collectors.

More information can be found here!

PUB: ‘Local contexts as activation mechanisms of market development: contemporary art in emerging markets’ by Nataliya Komarova & Olav Velthuis

Is available to read here!

The paper studies how local contexts contribute to the emergence of markets. In particular, it explains how potential entrepreneurs are motivated to become active in establishing new markets. Empirically, the focus is on contemporary art markets in two emerging countries: India and Russia. The paper draws upon qualitative interviews with 65 contemporary art dealers conducted in New Delhi, Mumbai, Moscow and Saint Petersburg. We show how different socio-cultural contexts function as activation mechanisms: in India, family backgrounds predominantly structure the decision-making processes, among others through the economic, social and cultural capital which these families provide. In Russia, by contrast, such family background is non-existent. Instead, the socio-economic turmoil of 1990s and 2000s as well as the strong involvement of the state function as activation mechanisms. We suggest that these different activation mechanisms contribute to explaining the diverging market performance in both countries.

Enoy!