CFP: Art Market and Art Collecting (Berlin/Paris, Nov 18/Mar 19)

ART MARKET AND ART COLLECTING FROM 1900 TO THE PRESENT IN GERMANY AND FRANCE

German-French Research Programme
Berlin, Germany, 8–10 November 2018
Paris, France, 11–13 March 2019

Deadline: Sep 14, 2018

Refugee crises, trade wars, migration debates: within the context of global geopolitical, economic and cultural-political upheavals, Europe is presently undergoing a process of transformation. At the same time, European territorial occupations and colonial rule of the past are coming increasingly into the focus of national and transnational scholarship and the politics underlying it.

The 2018–2019 German-French Research Programme organised by the Forum Kunst und Markt/Centre for Art Market Studies of the Technische Universität Berlin and the Centre Georg Simmel of the Paris-based École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in cooperation with the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris responds to these dynamics. Continue reading “CFP: Art Market and Art Collecting (Berlin/Paris, Nov 18/Mar 19)”

CFP: Max Slevogt und seine Netzwerke (Mainz, 29-30 Nov 18)

Landesmuseum Mainz, 29. – 30.11.2018
Deadline: Jun 15, 2018

Call for Papers

Max Slevogt und seine Netzwerke

2018 ist ein Slevogtjubiläumsjahr, das mit einem Reigen von Ausstellungen begangen wird. Angefangen mit “Max Slevogt. Impression und Phantasie – Zum 150. Geburtstag” (17. März 2018–13. Mai 2018) in der Pfalzgalerie Kaiserlautern, gefolgt von “Slevogt und Frankreich” des Saarlandmuseums Saarbrücken (1. September 2018–13. Januar 2019), dann der Retrospektive zum 150. Geburtstag des Künstlers im Landesmuseum Hannover (28. September 2018 – 24. Februar 2019) und schließlich endend mit “Ein Tag am Meer. Slevogt, Liebermann und Cassirer” (9. Oktober 2018–10. Februar 2019) im Landesmuseum Mainz. Continue reading “CFP: Max Slevogt und seine Netzwerke (Mainz, 29-30 Nov 18)”

CfP: Art on the Move – Mobility in the Long Nineteenth Century, Jan 2018, Birmingham

Friday 12 and Saturday 13 January 2018, Barber Institute, University of Birmingham

Conference Organisers: Kate Nichols (Birmingham) and Barbara Pezzini (Manchester)

Keynote Speakers: Pamela Fletcher and Tapati Guha Thakurta

Call for Papers Now Open

In the nineteenth century the circulation of works of art developed into its recognisably modern form. The forces of increasingly globalized capitalism, imperial routes and new means of transport, coupled with the growing reach of advertising and the press caused an unprecedented movement of artists, goods and materials. Larger audiences for art in newly founded museums and galleries across the world also contributed to, and benefitted from, this increased mobility of art.

Nineteenth-century mobility still awaits a thorough art historical investigation. This two-day conference aims to map, examine and problematize this emerging field. What is distinctive about the nineteenth-century circulation of art objects? How does mobility impact upon the modes of art production? Does it engender new subjects and materials? How important is the mobility of art to nineteenth-century art history? What impact does such transnational exchange have on national narratives of art? How are imbalances of power involved and developed through the mobility of art? How do the different networks of mobility – social, commercial and cultural – intersect? Which methodological approaches are best suited to this area of investigation?

The conference will be divided into principal thematic sessions, and we invite paper proposals of case studies or broader analyses that address some aspects of these interlinked beams:

  • networks of production
  • networks of cultural exchange
  • networks of commerce
  • networks of reception.

Potential topics may include: Visualising mobility and networks, mobility of people/objects, reproduction, replication and mobility, the ethics of mobility, enforced mobility, the role of art markets, refusal to move, and methodological approaches to mobility.

The conference will coincide with an exhibition dedicated to the works of Birmingham born engraver, miniature portraitist and photographer Thomas Bock (c.1793 – 1855) at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham. In 1823 Bock was found guilty of “administering concoctions of certain herbs … with the intent to cause miscarriage” and was transported to the Australian penal colony of Van Diemens Land, where he was pressed into service as a convict artist. Bock’s artistic output includes portraits of Tasmanian Aborigines, his fellow criminals as well as free settlers in Hobart Town. Many of these images returned to Britain, although Bock himself remained in Australia until his death in 1855. This is the first exhibition dedicated to Bock’s work to be held in Britain. An evening reception will be held at Ikon, with a private view of the exhibition and curatorial reflections on exhibiting the circulation of artists and their work.

Please send paper proposals of a maximum length of 250 words, accompanied by a 150 words biography, by Friday 31 March 2017 to artonthemove19@gmail.com 

Art on the Move